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Around the world in apples

Around the world with Apples ~ Celebrating the first day of Autumn

Around the world in apples

When the air bites. When my cheeks turn pink.

These moments sing autumn.

But now that I live in Oklahoma the first day of fall – September 23 – is almost always balmy.

Sometimes it’s actually hot.

Which means Ava can do this:

Enjoying Fall

The only surefire way I know it’s autumn is to watch the apples. There’s nothing like the crisp taste of a freshly plucked apple enjoyed while still standing in the orchard. The fruit is almost chalky on the tongue, the skin tight, the flesh sweet. When apples spring to life like this… well, that’s how I know it is autumn.

As you fill your fruit basket with the season’s bounty, I invite you to play around with these apple recipes. They’re plucked from three continents and will make a great addition to your next around the world party or international night!

In fact, I’ll be making one or two of them this week myself! Join me on Instagram so we can share our adventures!

APPLE RECIPES FROM AROUND THE WORLD

1. Fig and Honey Apple Polenta Cake | Bustrengo (San Marino)

Around the world with apples: 10 recipes to welcome autumn >> San Marino Fig and Honey Apple Polenta cake.

Bustrengo is a really special cake from a tiny country inside Italy (yes, you read that right – San Marino is located within the borders of Italy!). I promise your guests will have never tasted anything quite like it – from the polenta to the sweet figs and honey this dense cake has old world flavor. Best warm from the oven, one slice is sure to take the chill out of the air.  Best served with hot tea and a flurry of powdered sugar. Try the recipe.

Around the world with apples: 10 recipes to welcome autumn.

2. Apple Pancakes (Latvia)

Around the world with apples: 10 recipes to welcome autumn >> Latvian Apple Pancakes

Apple ‘pancakes’ are common throughout Europe. These ones are really more of a crepe and are best made with grated or very thinly sliced apples – the finer texture makes the thin treat moist and sweet. Fantastic with a dribble of syrup or honey and a smile! Try the recipe.

3. Apple Cake | Äppelkuch (Luxembourg)

Around the world with apples: 10 recipes to welcome autumn >> Luxembourg's Apple Cake

Luxembourg may be a tiny country in Europe, but this tender cake is grand. Perhaps most surprising is the metamorphosis it undergoes while baking – the dense batter and cream base combine for perfect for a teatime pick-me-up. Try the recipe.

4. Apple Empanadas (South America | Argentina)

Around the world with apples: 10 recipes to welcome autumn >> Empanadas

I like to think of these as South America’s answer to apple pie… but better in at least one way: I can eat at five. No way I could eat full-sized 5 apple pies! Included are careful instructions for repulging – don’t worry, that’s just the term for how they’re rolled! Try the recipe.

5. Polish Apple Pie | Szarlotka

Around the world with apples: 10 recipes to welcome autumn >> Polish apple pie

This stacked dessert from eastern Europe would elevate any dinner party. The tender sour cream crust holds together well to make very neat slices once the “pie” cools. I like these room temperature with whipped cream and tea. Try the recipe.

Around the world with apples: 10 recipes to welcome autumn >> Polish Apple Pie

6. All-American Apple Pie 

Around the world with apples: 10 recipes to welcome autumn >> All-American Apple Pie

A childhood favorite from my own mother’s kitchen! While most apple pies in North America are made with Granny Smiths, I prefer sweeter specimens. Delish when balanced out with a good squeeze of lemon juice. What more can I say…this recipe is in constant rotation. Try the recipe.

7. Brandy Poached Apples (Firikia Glyko) – Cyprus

Around the world with apples: 10 recipes to welcome autumn >> Apples poached in honey and spices.

A sweet mix of cinnamon, cloves and brandy infused into tender fruit … in Eastern European style! Perfect served hot, with large scoop of vanilla ice cream. (Be sure to drizzle the warm sauce over the ice cream).

And… psst… here’s a handy infographic for how to make it!

Around the World with Apples >>  Brandy Poached Apples from Cyprus

8. Wassail – Europe

Around the world with apples: 10 recipes to welcome autumn >> Wassail

A traditional drink in the United Kingdom made with roasted apples, cider, oranges, cinnamon, and nutmeg. You can use hard cider to add a festive spirit! Try the recipe.

9. Danish Apple Cake | Æblekage

Around the world with apples: 10 recipes to welcome autumn >> Danish Apple Cake

This Danish recipe comes from a reader’s mother – complete with nuts, apples, and warming spices. A breakfasty sort of treat. Try the recipe.

10. Wooden Spoon Applesauce – Liechtenstein

Around the world with apples: 10 recipes to welcome autumn >> Apple Sauce from Liechtenstein

And when all else fails? Make homemade applesauce like they do in Liechtenstein. Ripe apples will turn soft in no time- though firmer apples like Granny Smiths may take a bit more coaxing. Cinnamon is a must! Try the recipe.

11. Bonus! 

Rosh Hashanah Greetings

September 24th is Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year… guess one way the holiday is celebrated? That’s right – with apples! The sweetened fruit signifies the intention for a sweet year. Awesome!

 

World Peace Day Recipe Challenge #EatInPeace #WorldPeaceDay #GlobalTableAdventure

Official World Peace Day Recipe

ava and the world GTE

Look up recipes for world peace and you’ll find one of two things – a moral diatribe or Dori Greenspan’s chocolate chip cookies. While the former is on point, and the latter is undeniably incredible, I’m looking for something a little more… grounded… in the holiday.

So I went back to the source for inspiration. Turns out the United Nations came up with “International Day of Peace” in 1981 and the first celebration occurred in 1982. Lots of people – myself included – simply call the September 21st holiday “World Peace Day.”

What’s World Peace Day all about?

World Peace Day is about having one day.

One day without weapons.

One day without killing.

One day of treating each other with compassion, kindness and humanity.

I get turkey fatigue on Thanksgiving and go chocolate bezerk on Valentine’s Day, but World Peace Day is one holiday I wish could last forever.

6,000 members of the Ithaca community form the world's largest human peace sign. Photo by Rebecca Eschler.

6,000 members of the Ithaca community form the world’s largest human peace sign. Photo by Rebecca Eschler.

OFFICIAL WORLD PEACE DAY RECIPE

Serves 7.25 Billion

Ingredients:

1 large heart
1 recipe from a country in conflict
7.25 billion friends

Method:

STEP 1

Imagine how mealtime would change in a world without war.

So much of war is outside of the average person’s control. Most people just want to wake up happy, healthy and able to feed their families. If they could concentrate on feeding their families without fear of air strikes or raids, there could be time for the simple joys of sitting and visiting together well after the last morsel is consumed.

They could #EatInPeace.

ava eats the world

STEP 2 

Make it age appropriate.

For some, sharing the basic culture of country without going into current events is the only age-appropriate way to teach young children about a country. Keep in mind, even if you aren’t talking politics with your youngest children, you are still laying the groundwork for peace and understanding simply by giving the country a place at your table!

“With Ukraine in the news so much, it is a perfect time to explore the country… It is also a perfect time for lessons with older children about current events and such. Since we do not let Hazel know about current events or watch the news, we looked at tradition, food and crafts…

I have always loved learning about different cultures and feel it is important for everyone to know a bit about other people in order for us to be able to get along… To introduce the countries I usually type the country name in the library search engine for children’s books and see what comes up.

Carrie, excerpts from Around the World in 12 Dishes.

syria.food.recipe.img_0263

Ava enjoys food from Syria

STEP 3

Cook a meal from a country in conflict.

By cooking countries in conflict, we can bring ourselves closer to their culture and see our global neighbors as real people, not just some news story. We can understand the peace they want and all people deserve.

“I like to think, actually I pray that my children will know a person is a person no matter where in the world they are. That bad things happen not because of a dot on a map, or a religion – but simply because bad things happen because of people who have bad ideas.”

Amanda from MarocMama

Think of it as any international night you might host for your family, but with a cause. To get started, take a look at the countries I’ve cooked map and select one whose struggles speak to you. There are over 650 recipes representing every country in the world for you to choose from!

Ava eats Afghanistan

Ava enjoys food from Afghanistan at 7 months old.

STEP 4

Take time during dinner to acknowledge or discuss whatever conflict you chose.

You will learn so much about the country over dinner – and perhaps more about your family. I was particularly touched by Farrah’s story – how her Uncle never would eat daal:

The first time I offered daal to him, he refused, saying he had eaten it every day of his 4 year imprisonment as a prisoner of war. That’s all he says. Despite my prodding, I haven’t gotten any more details from him. Here’s what I do know, though. During the Indo-Pak War of 1971, Bangladesh waged its own liberation war…

But there’s a happy ending: the family finally does sit down to share the daal. As they eat this simple dish they’d once avoided, the conversation flows – and the simple meal heals their painful memories:

My mom recounts tales of digging trenches and lying in them when they heard the sirens. She remembers that all the girls in the family learned to handle guns, and practiced emergency drills in case of invasion. All these stories come gushing forth over a bowl of daal, if you can believe that.

Farrah, Global Advocate Jr.

Tip: If you’d like to start with something more tame because of young children, discuss challenges like extreme weather with your little ones. 

ukranian-menu

Beautiful food from Ukraine.

STEP 5

While eating talk about how to bring the world closer to peace.

It is not just enough to enjoy the food of anther culture – but also to talk with our hearts towards peace. Respect and kindness should rule the conversation, even if the tone is serious.

My husband remembers civil unrest when he lived in South Africa that would eventually lead to his family having to return to Germany. Our friends were raised by parents that survived the horrors of Nazi occupied Germany.

Talking about conflict can easily turn the mood somber, we all fell quiet for a moment as we took in everything we had just heard. But we decided to turn it around and toasted to “May the world one day figure out that life needs us all.”

Adriana, Changing Plate.

south-sudanese-menu

A traditional South Sudanese meal.

For all the families that tried it, this challenge was a wonderful, eye-opening experience.

So, you might be asking… now what?

Well…

World Peace Day Recipe Challenge #EatInPeace #WorldPeaceDay #GlobalTableAdventure

Now it’s YOUR turn… take the challenge!

You’ll be in great company – this summer I started a challenge on GOOD for people to cook food from a country in conflict. It quickly landed on the front page of the web site and got a lot of people talking.

I’d like to extend the challenge to you today.

Cook a meal from a country in conflict and share your experience.

Will you laugh? Will you cry? Who knows. But you WILL eat well.

#EatInPeace
#GlobalTableAdventure

#WorldPeaceDay

xxoo

Sasha & family

 

doro-wat

Celebrating the Ethiopian New Year with Doro Wat

How to make Doro Wat for the Ethiopian New Year

There’s been a movement to make Enkutatash – a.k.a. Ethiopian New Year – as popular as St. Patrick’s Day or Cinco de Mayo.  But instead of wearing green or dancing to a mariachi band you’re invited for a much simpler, down to earth sort of celebration.

Wear white.

Pick yellow daisies.

And enjoy traditional Ethiopian food.

Waaaay back when

“Enkutatash” literally stands for “gift of jewels.”

As the story goes, several thousand years ago the Queen of Sheba delivered more than 4.5 tons of gold and as many spices to King Solomon. King Solomon was quite the host as he, too, showered her with gifts:

The Queen of Sheba from medieval manuscript «Bellifortis» by Conrad Kyeser (c. 1405), Prague school.

The Queen of Sheba from medieval manuscript «Bellifortis» by Conrad Kyeser (c. 1405).

…in return, King Solomon had assembled an array of gifts for her arrival. Great caskets of sticky Nubian millet beer awaited her party.

The gifts were staked on mules outside Solomon’s palace, ready for her people to take to their camp and enjoy. Silks and linens from Gaza, Assyria, and Lebanon. Tapestry from Ma-Wara-Mnar. Dresses, sweet fruit from Iraq, Mongolistan winter melons. And basins of water from the spring at Siloe.

Following the queen’s arrival, Solomon gave her a luxurious apartment in a palace next to his, and provided her with fruits, rose trees, silks, linens, tapestries, and 11 bewitching garments for each day of her visit. Daily, he sent her (and her 350 servants) 45 sacks of flour, 10 oxen, 5 bulls, 50 sheep (in addition to goats, deer, cows, gazelles, and chicken), wine, honey, fried locusts, rich sweets, and 25 singing men and women. (Source)

 

 

That’s quite the haul!

(I particularly love the 25 singing men and women – imagine how great life would be if we had our own personal chorus?)

Upon the Queen of Sheba’s celebrated return to Ethiopia, her people showered her with even more jewels (to replace the ones she’d given away, of course).

When jewels and flowers collide

Today – in the spirit of the Queen – Ethiopians wear their best clothes on the New Year – typically a white dress or tunic with vivid embroidered trimmings. Gold bangles and necklaces rustle and jingle throughout the day.

Look at these stunners!

Ethiopian New Year Style. Photos by @pinkgypsy_ old_n_indaway and rachelmichellewarner

Ethiopian New Year Style. Photos by @pinkgypsy_, @old_n_indaway and @rachelmichellewarner

Clothes for Ethiopian New Year; Photo by @Magitareke on Instagram

Clothes for Ethiopian New Year; Photo by @Magitareke on Instagram

When to celebrate

The festival falls right after the rainy season ends – between September 11th and 12th (this year it falls on the 11th), making it a natural time to collect yellow daisies and long grasses. Children often carry these door to door. Families will spread the grasses on their floors, especially in remote areas, to help bring in the New Year.

Modern Traditions

In the simplest of celebrations people exchange flowers or, in more recent times, cards. But it is the food that cannot be missed. Animals are slaughtered (usually sheep or chicken), injera is cooked (and blessed), and then everyone enjoys lunch with the freshly prepared food.

Families and friends practice Gursha, or the act of feeding each other by hand. While it might feel extrememly personal to put your hand to someone’s mouth, Ethiopians would wonder if you hesitate…. Even among strangers, Gursha is a sign of trust no different than a handshake or hug.

Finally, at the end of the meal a traditional coffee ceremony is performed. Green coffee beans are roasted in front of the guests and everyone enjoys no less than the traditional three cups. Learn how to host your own coffee ceremony today!

And now… let’s eat!

Wot is the main course for the Ethopian New Year, usually made with lamb or chicken.

Today I offer Doro Wat (“doro” means chicken, “wat or “wot” means stew).

PRONOUNCE IT: Doro (rhymes with Zorro) and wet, like the rain.

The recipe is inspired by Marcus Samuelsson’s appearance on Martha Stewart and is a hybrid of several traditional recipes.

Ingredients for Doro Wat.

A real wat  uses about a 1/2 cup of berberé, the traditional East African spice blend of chili powder, fenugreek, ginger, cinnamon, and more. The blend is incredibly flavorful and HOT. The dish is nicely balanced, thanks to the brightness of fresh lemon juice and/or yogurt.

Feel free to modify the recipe as you’d like – but if you can handle some heat, I’d recommend leaving the recipe as-is!

Enjoy with our Homemade Injera recipe (whose sour flavor is fantastic with doro wat)… or serve with rice for an easy, non-traditional option.

Serves 4-6

Ingredients

4 red onions
3 large cloves crushed garlic
2 teaspoons freshly grated ginger
1/2 cup clarified butter or ghee
1/2 cup homemade berberé
1-2 cups water (as needed)
2 – 2.25 lbs chicken pieces (legs and thighs, skin removed)
salt, to taste (about 1 tablespoon)

Finishing:

4-6 hardboiled eggs
1/4-1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
1 lemon
plain yogurt, as desired

Method:

Onions are the real star of this dish! You need 4 – which is a lot!

The perfect time to pull out your food processor, if you have one.

How to make Doro Wat

Peel and cut the onions in 1-inch hunks. Toss into the food processor and pulse until finely chopped. Scrape once or twice if needed. Alternatively cut them by hand.

How to finely chop onions for Doro Wat

Cook onions in a dry pot over high heat until they start to stick to the pan. This stage should take 20-30 minutes.

How to make Doro Wat

Add the garlic and ginger and cook another 10-15 min until brown. Gradually reduce the heat as necessary to prevent burning.

Here’s what the onions looked like when I added the ghee along with the homemade berberé.

recipe.ethiopian.chicken.img_6374

Cook 5 minutes, until the spices bloom in the ghee. It will look like dark chocolate:

recipe.ethiopian.chicken.img_6379

Finally, add the water and chicken.  Cover tightly and simmer gently until tender (a good 45 minutes). Thin with a little water if necessary and stir occasionally to prevent sticking. I used about 1 1/2 cups water total.

While the Wat cooks, hardboil the eggs. Cut decorative wedges in the egg if desired.

How to decorate hard boiled eggs for doro wat.

Finish the wat off with a sprinkle of cardamom and half the lemon, juiced. Cut the remaining lemon in wedges and serve on the side. A few spoonfuls of plain yogurt makes for a nice, cooling accompaniment to the spicy stew.

This is one of those messy foods that tastes as good as it doesn’t look. There’s spice, yes, but there’s also complexity from the sweet onion, and richness from the ghee.

Enjoy with your hands, and practice gursha if you’d like!

Doro Wat recipe

Enjoy and Happy Enkutatash!

P.S. For your little ones who are brave enough to try this dish: try the technique I learned from Bhutan: give them the food, but wipe off the hot stuff first. (In Bhutan mothers will do this for their babies with their mouths!)

recipe.ethiopian.chicken.img_6417

In this case I added the hard-boiled eggs to the sauce, then wiped off most of the onion mixture. The flavor and some heat will still be there (below you can see it stained the egg), but the kiddos can handle this more tame rendition. If the heat is still too much, make sure there’s some plain yogurt and milk nearby!

recipe.ethiopian.chicken.img_6420

Happy Ethiopian New Year Greetings

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Wot is the main course for the Ethopian New Year, usually made with lamb or chicken. Today I offer Doro Wat (“doro” means chicken, “wat or “wot” means stew). PRONOUNCE IT: Doro (rhymes with Zorro) and wet, like the rain. Enjoy with our Homemade Injera recipe (whose sour flavor is fantastic with doro wat)… or serve with rice for an easy, non-traditional option.Celebrating the Ethiopian New Year with Doro Wat
Servings Prep Time
4-6people 15minutes
Cook Time
1 1/2hours
Servings Prep Time
4-6people 15minutes
Cook Time
1 1/2hours
Ingredients
Finishing:
Instructions
  1. Peel and cut the onions in 1-inch hunks. Toss into the food processor and pulse until finely chopped. Scrape once or twice if needed. Alternatively cut them by hand.
  2. Cook onions in a dry pot over high heat until they start to stick to the pan. This stage should take 20-30 minutes.
  3. Add the garlic and ginger and cook another 10-15 min until brown. Gradually reduce the heat as necessary to prevent burning.
  4. Cook 5 minutes, until the spices bloom in the ghee. It will look like dark chocolate.
  5. Finally, add the water and chicken. Cover tightly and simmer gently until tender (a good 45 minutes). Thin with a little water if necessary and stir occasionally to prevent sticking. I used about 1 1/2 cups water total.
  6. While the Wat cooks, hardboil the eggs. Cut decorative wedges in the egg if desired.
  7. Finish the wat off with a sprinkle of cardamom and half the lemon, juiced. Cut the remaining lemon in wedges and serve on the side. A few spoonfuls of plain yogurt makes for a nice, cooling accompaniment to the spicy stew. This is one of those messy foods that tastes as good as it doesn’t look. There’s spice, yes, but there’s also complexity from the sweet onion, and richness from the ghee. Enjoy with your hands!
Recipe Notes

A real wat  uses about a 1/2 cup of berberé, the traditional East African spice blend of chili powder, fenugreek, ginger, cinnamon, and more. The blend is incredibly flavorful and HOT. The dish is nicely balanced, thanks to the brightness of fresh lemon juice and/or yogurt. Feel free to modify the recipe as you’d like – but if you can handle some heat, I’d recommend leaving the recipe as-is!

Source:

Recipe Copyright Sasha Martin, Global Table Adventure. For personal or educational use only.

recipe.Fattoush.img_6214

Fattoush, a Levantene Salad for Kahlil Gibran

How to make Fattoush

“The astronomer may speak to you of his understanding of space, but he cannot give you his understanding
… the vision of one man lends not its wings to another man.”

- Kahlil Gibran

The best teachers’ lessons stay relevant long after their deaths. Such is the case with the Lebanese poet Kahlil Gibran (1883-1931). Often, when I’m at a loss for what to do, I’ll pick up his book The Prophet.

Despite living a nearly hundred years ago, his wisdom still disarms me.

Kahil Gibran Quote: ""And when you crush an apple with your teeth, say to it in your heart, 'Your seeds shall live in my body, And the buds of your tomorrow shall blossom in my heart, And your fragrance shall be my breath, And together we shall rejoice through all the seasons.'"

That’s just one of his many beautiful lines.

I love the idea that the fresh produce we eat not only becomes a part of us, but improves us – brings us to life. The work of modern nutritionists back up Gibran – this is not just poetry, it’s science.

How to make Fattoush

So this week I’m making him a salad.

A salad enjoyed in his corner of the world (Gibran was born in Lebanon and, even after living in the United States, chose to be buried in Lebanon). Here’s the museum they built in his honor:

Kahlil Gibran Museum

Gibran Museum, located in Bsharri, Lebanon. Photo by Xtcrider.

This salad celebrates his teachings … and the bittersweet fact that Ava is in kindergarten this year, learning in leaps and bounds (she had her first Chinese class the other day!). 

Ava goes back to school

Such a big girl! 

(sob)

Apparently Gibran waited years before he shared his manuscript with his publisher; he wanted it to make sure every word was just right. What a glory to know we have his best words at our fingertips.

A recipe for Fattoush

I chose a salad called Fattoush to thank him – a happy combination of toasted pita, rough-chopped salad bits - cucumber, lettuce, green onion (or red), the last of the gorgeous summer tomatoes – and I toss them with fresh herbs  (mint and parsley really pop). Variations include feta and olives. The dressing is a bright lemon garlic affair, with ground sumac for a tart garnish.

This casual beauty is enjoyed throughout the Middle East, especially in Lebanon, Syria (and now… in our little corner of Tulsa, Oklahoma), making dinnertime fresh and cool.

How to make Fattoush Dressing

TIP: In a hurry? Buy pita chips at the store to make an already quick meal lightening fast!

Ingredients:

For the dressing:

juice of 2 lemons, seeds removed but not strained
1/2 cup olive oil
3 cloves garlic, crushed
1 teaspoon salt
pepper

For the salad:

1 head romaine lettuce, torn or sliced
1 cucumber, sliced in quarter moons
2 cups cherry tomatoes
1 cup mint leaves, torn
1/2 cup parsley leaves, torn
1 green pepper, chopped
6 green onions, sliced

For the garnishes:

2 pieces of pita bread toasted and broken into small pieces
1/4-1/3 cup olive oil
salt

feta, to taste (optional)
black olives (optional)
Ground sumac for dusting (optional)

Method:

For the salad dressing:

Combine all ingredients in a bowl or jar and mix thoroughly.

How to make Fattoush Dressing

Salad dressing for fattoush

Prepare the pita chips

Toast the whole pita in a frying pan over medium-low heat until crisp.  When cool break into pieces and place in a medium bowl; pour oil over and toss to coat. Season pita to taste with salt.

Toasting pita chips for Fattoush

Assemble the salad:

Add all salad ingredients to a large bowl. Toss with salad dressing to taste (I used about half of it). Add the pita chips and any desired garnishes (or set the garnishes out on the table in small bowls so the guests can choose what they’d like).

I like to serve fattoush on a large platter instead of a bowl – it makes for a pretty presentation and somehow makes the meal feel as grand as it should.

In no time you’ll go from this…

How to make Fattoush

 

… to this:
How to make Fattoush

Smiles all around!

How to make Fattoush

Enjoy!

And thanks, Mr. Gibran!

Kahlil Gibran as an adult, a youth, and with his family (standing on the left of his father).

Kahlil Gibran as an adult, a youth, and with his family (standing on the left of his father).

Kahlil Gibran quote

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Fattoush is a happy combination of toasted pita, rough-chopped salad bits - cucumber, lettuce, green onion (or red), the last of the gorgeous summer tomatoes - and I toss them with fresh herbs (mint and parsley really pop). Variations include feta and olives. The dressing is a bright lemon garlic affair, with ground sumac for a tart garnish. This casual beauty is enjoyed throughout the Middle East, especially in Lebanon, Syria - making dinnertime fresh and cool.Fattoush, a Levantene Salad for Kahlil Gibran
Ingredients
For the dressing:
For the salad:
For the garnishes:
Instructions
For the salad dressing:
  1. Combine all ingredients in a bowl or jar and mix thoroughly.
Prepare the pita chips:
  1. Toast the whole pita in a frying pan over medium-low heat until crisp. When cool break into pieces and place in a medium bowl; pour oil over and toss to coat. Season pita to taste with salt.
Assemble the salad:
  1. Add all salad ingredients to a large bowl. Toss with salad dressing to taste (I used about half of it). Add the pita chips and any desired garnishes (or set the garnishes out on the table in small bowls so the guests can choose what they'd like). I like to serve fattoush on a large platter instead of a bowl - it makes for a pretty presentation and somehow makes the meal feel as grand as it should.
Source:

Recipe Copyright Sasha Martin, Global Table Adventure. For personal or educational use only.

40 DRINKS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

Celebrate Labor Day with 40 Cold Drinks from around the world

40 COLD DRINKS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

 

IMG_0788_HsmHi friends!

When someone asks how you are doing, do you reply “Oh, SO busy”? I recently read that being ‘busy’ is the new norm. Turns out that’s how many people are measuring their self worth and even asserting their status as an “important” person.

Ugg.

This makes labor day an even more important holiday in my book.  A time to slow down, enjoy the bounty the world has to offer, and just… be… with your family and friends. I’ve compiled 40 cold drinks from your global neighbors for you to enjoy this weekend (perhaps not all at once, eh?).

Bonus challenge?

Vow not to say you’re busy for the entire month of September.
Even if you are. #letsbanbusy
xxoo Sasha

NOTE: These recipes are enjoyed in their particular countries, but not necessarily exclusive to the countries.

 

Cold drinks from Africa

The African drinks we’ve tried on our cooking adventure include a lot of fresh, tropical fruits like mango, pineapple and papaya. There’s also a good deal of ginger (think ginger beer and ginger tea), hibiscus, and earthy spices like cinnamon. All of these ingredients grow easily in Africa. The most unusual drink by far has to be the “burnt” rice tea, made with toasted leftover rice in Madagascar. A real curiosity that’s sure to fascinate your loved ones.

 

African drink recipes (from upper left to bottom right)


Vanilla Ginger Bissap
 | Mali
West-African Inspired Watermelon Lemonade | Ghana
Chapman Cocktail | Nigeria
“Burnt” Rice Tea (Ranovola) | Madagascar
Mango Daiquiris | Cameroon
Swahili Ginger n’ Milk Tea | Mozambique
Coconut Milkshake | Cape Verde
Lemon Ginger Tea (Gingembre) | The Gambia
Spiced Papaya Milk | Chad
Iced Hibiscus Drink with Pineapple (Bissap a la Bonne Dame) | Burkina Faso
Not pictured: Coconut Milk Chiller | Cape Verde

.

Cold drinks from Asia

Asia is an enormous continent which extends from the Arabian peninsula, through eastern Russia, all the way east towards Japan. We were lucky enough to try cold drinks available representative of this variety. Anything with rosewater or orange blossom water is interesting (When I first tried it I thought it was like drinking perfume, but now the floral note is a household favorite). Kids will love the drinks with unusual textures (like tapioca pearls or jello in the glass – so fun!).

 

Asian drink recipes (from upper left to bottom right)


Masala Chai (Spiced tea with milk)
 | India
Israeli Juice (Lemon-Limeade with fresh mint) | Israel
Tapioca & Jello Sipper | Sago at Gulaman | Philippines
Rosewater Lemonade | Oman
Orange Blossom Juice | UAE
Lomi Lomi | Maldives
Not pictured: Espresso Jello with Evaporated Milk | Japan

.

Cold drinks from Europe

I’m not sure what happened with the European drinks we sampled – but there’s a lot more boozy drinks in this list – everything from the Lithuanian Honey Spirits (take it from me: make them now for Christmas gifts later), to the quirky concoction called Bambus, made with red wine and coca cola (apparently a great way to use up sub-par wine)!

 

European drink recipes (from upper left to bottom right)


Iced Fruit Drink (Kompot)
 | Bulgaria
Honey Spirits (Krupnikas) | Lithuania
Sangria | Spain
Finnish Blueberry Milk | Finland
Bambus (Celebration Drink) | Croatia

.

Cold drinks from North America

Here’s another grouping that makes me smile – all sorts of fresh fruit, sparkling flavors, and certainly more than a little bit of “punch.” One of my favorites is also Jimmy Buffet’s favorite – the spiked Coconut Water, but I’ll take a Killer Bee or Strawberry Horchata any day of the week. The strangest one of all is definitely the grapefruit and avocado smoothie… the creamy avocado gives the drink body (and does a body good)!

 

North American drink recipes  (from upper left to bottom right)


Spiked Coconut Water
 |Barbados
Pineapple Horchata | Nicaragua
Sparkling Grapefruit Breeze | Antigua & Barbuda
Caribbean Rum Punch | Grenada & beyond
Mojito | Cuba
Killer Bee Cocktail with Black Pepper & Nutmeg | Saint Kitts and Nevis
Strawberry Almond Horchata | Mexico
Sorrel Drink | Jamaica
Grapefruit & Avocado Smoothie | Dominica
Bahama Mama | Bahamas

.

Cold drinks from Oceania

These are such fun! The Recycled Iced Coffee has the most interesting background (locals they really do sell them from shacks in recycled water bottles and other plastic containers!), while the ‘Otai and Papaya sipper are nearly impossible to put down. Seriously.

 

Oceanic drink recipes (from upper left to bottom right)


“Recycled” Iced Coffee
 | Nauru
Coconut Watermelon Refresher | ‘Otai | Tonga
Pineapple Papaya Coco Sipper | Micronesia

.

SOUTH AMERICAN DRINKS

South America knows what’s what… but perhaps this list is not what you may have expected. The fruit salad looking drink is as awesome as the coca cola infused ice coffee (I mean, how could it not be?!). Perhaps most interesting, however, is the Lemongrass Dawet – originally a drink from Asia but that has been popularized in Suriname. I dare say, the USA is not the only melting pot!

 

South American drink recipes (from upper left to bottom right)


Colombian Oatmeal Smoothie (Avena)
 | Colombia
Iced Brazilian Mocha-Cola | Brazil
Lemongrass Dawet | Suriname
Venezuelan Fruit Punch | Tizana | Venezuela

.

P.S. Here’s something for those of you looking to grill this Labor Day: 21 of the World’s Best Grilled Eats!

The-world's-best-grilled-recipes

Cold soup recipes from around the world.

Chill out with 7 cold soups from around the world

7 Cold soup recipes from around the world.

A few things have changed since the early days of this blog (namely the photography), but one thing is certain: I love a good, chilled soup in the summer. Here are seven awesome cold soup recipes from around the world that aren’t gazpacho – because, my goodness, there are other cold soups besides gazpacho! So, without further ado, summer’s almost over – let’s skip the heat and chill out.

1. Mul Naengmyeon | Korea [Recipe]

Iced Korean Buckwheat Noodles (Mul-naengmyeon) | 7 cold soups from around the world

This Korean recipe is the most recent addition to our collection – a soup so cold, it is actually served with ice. It’s claim to fame? The balance of flavor between earthy buckwheat noodles spicy cucumber, sweet Asian pear, and tart vinegar.

The best part? This soup is DIY, so everyone can add exactly what they like (and leave out the rest) – perfect for picky eaters who want to stovetop travel to Korea!

Mount Bukhansan (북한산) seen from Shinseondae (신선대) Peak observation area. Photo by Kellnerp.

Mount Bukhansan (북한산) seen from Shinseondae (신선대) Peak observation area. Photo by Kellnerp.

2. Rye Bread Soup with Homemade Rhubarb Raisins | Iceland [Recipe]

 

Rye Bread Soup Recipe | Iceland | 7 Cold soup recipes from around the world.

A soup made with bread? Yup. It’s thick, heavy on the rye, and just odd enough to get table conversation going. While traditionally served hot, Brauðsúpadc makes quite an interesting cold soup. My favorite part has to be the “raisin topping” made from sun dried rhubarb – so easy and fun! You make them in the oven or – if it’s super hot where you live – you can literally dry them in the sun. Fun for the whole family!

It’s just the kind of soup to turn heads.

Just ask this horse.

An Icelandic horse near Krýsuvík. Photo by Andreas Tille.

An Icelandic horse near Krýsuvík. Photo by Andreas Tille.

3. Tart Rhubarb Soup | Iceland [Recipe]

 

Tart Rhubarb Soup Recipe | Iceland | 7 Cold soup recipes from around the world.

Speaking of rhubarb, this soup just might be the happy offspring of rhubarb and lemonade. The puree is tart in a sparkly sort of way, rounded out with a touch of sweetness. Want to make a good thing even better? Give each bowlful a soft spoon of whipped cream on top.

It’ll taste the way this feels:

Sunset at Goðafoss in Winter, Iceland. Photo by Andreas Tille.

Sunset at Goðafoss in Winter, Iceland. Photo by Andreas Tille.

4. Chilled Cherry Soup | Hungary [Recipe]

 

Chilled Cherry Soup | Hungary | 7 Cold soup recipes from around the world.

This cherrylicious soup is one of my favorites. Sure, I’m part Hungarian, but even if I weren’t the combination of cherries, wine and cinnamon is… ridiculous. In the best possible way. You can use fresh tart cherries or jarred – but be sure to top each bowl the Hungarian way: with sour cream. The richness is the perfect foil to the fruity soup. Perhaps it might be fun to enjoy while contemplating the work of Hungarian artist József Rippl-Rónai (1861–1927) – a sour cherry tree!

Sour Cherry Tree in Blossom (1909). Photo by

Sour Cherry Tree in Blossom (1909). Painting by József Rippl-Rónai (1861–1927)

 

5. Coco-Mango Soup | Guyana [Recipe]

 

Coco-Mango Soup | Guyana | 7 Cold soup recipes from around the world.

This might be my favorite of the cold soups – simply puree fresh mango with coconut milk, yogurt, and honey…. until satin-smooth… top with coconut chips. I mean… what’s not to love?! Still not sure? It takes like… 10 minutes to whip together. Talk about an entertainers dream!

Thanks for this mango landing, Guyana!

Here’s another mango landing from Guyana to enjoy while we eat:

Pontoon Crossing at Mango Landing Essequibo River.

Pontoon Crossing at Mango Landing Essequibo River. Photo by Nick Taylor.

6. Chilled Cucumber Soup – Tarator | Bulgaria [Recipe]

 

Chilled Cucumber Soup - Tarator | 7 Cold soup recipes from around the world.

Tarator is a lovely surprise – fresh cucumbers and yogurt with a dollop of dill. A great big bite of delicious beloved throughout much of Eastern Europe but prepared when we cooked Bulgaria!

All in all, a great recipe that tastes like… a true Bulgarian beauty almost as great as this vista:

The Black sea coast near Chernomorets. Photo by Evgord.

The Black sea coast near Chernomorets. Photo by Evgord.

7. Borscht | Eastern Europe [Recipe]

 

Borscht | 7 Cold soup recipes from around the world.

Oh, look at this photo! Have faith ye new food blogger! Keep snapping those pictures. It took me four years of trial and error to put photos like this in the past. As for the soup? This one is as good cold as it is hot. We’re talking beets, cabbage, potatoes, and more.

Yum. Yum. Yum.

We tried it for Belarus where… apparently…

Swans on the beach beside the Dryviaty tourist centre near Braslaŭ, Belarus. Photo by Andrej Kuźniečyk.

Swans on the beach beside the Dryviaty tourist centre near Braslaŭ, Belarus. Photo by Andrej Kuźniečyk.

this swan lives…

As with the previous soup – you’ll find variations on this recipe throughout eastern Europe and central Asia.

Pssst… How are you keeping cold this summer? I invite you to try one of these soups and tag me on instagram (@globaltable) or use #GlobalTableAdventure to share your feast. I so LOVE seeing what you all are up to!

recipe.Iced.Korean.Buckwheat.Noodles.img_6295

Iced Korean Buckwheat Noodles | Mul-naengmyeon

Iced Korean Buckwheat Noodles | Mul-naengmyeon

Perhaps you’ve had chilled soup, but have you ever had soup on ice?

Korean naengmyeon is just that – a brothy, noodle soup topped with spicy cucumber, Asian pear, daikon radish, hard-boiled egg, and ice. While the soup starts out mild in flavor, adding vinegar, mustard oil (or paste), and even a spoonful of kimchee takes the soup to a whole new flavor profile – the catch is this seasoning is usually done at the table, so everyone can control how their naengmyeon tastes.

Do you want it spicy? Sour? Heavy on the pear? The choice is yours.

Iced Korean Buckwheat Noodles | Mul-naengmyeon

Iced Korean Buckwheat Noodles | Mul-naengmyeon

Have you ever had Asian pear?

I love Ava’s face, here! She wasn’t sure about the Asian pear, but ended up eating nearly an entire pear herself by the end of dinner. While you could substitute bosc pears or just leave them off, crisp Asian pears are incredibly floral as compared to standard pears… they remind me a lot of star fruit in that way.

Iced Korean Buckwheat Noodles | Mul-naengmyeon

Tips:

– I made my own seasoned broth, adding dried mushrooms and kelp powder, but if you’re in a hurry you could just use regular beef broth and call it a day. Doing this would make this a super fast weeknight meal.

– I got all the ingredients for this soup at my grocery store – the noodles and kelp powder were on the international aisle, the kimchee was refrigerated, and the daikon and asian pear were in the produce section.

– Try not to cut your noodles – slurping them whole is considered good luck. When purchasing the noodles, look for a combination of buckwheat and sweet potato flour – they provide the characteristic chewy/snap that makes the dish so fun to eat. In a pinch, regular buckwheat noodles can be substituted.

– You really don’t need all the toppings – that’s up to you. The key is to have fun and let your personality shine!

"Holding a drinking party" (transliteration:Jusa geobae) from Hyewon pungsokdo by 19th-century Korean painter, Hyewon. Original stored at Gansong Art Museum in Seoul, South Korea.

“Holding a drinking party” (transliteration:Jusa geobae) from Hyewon pungsokdo by 19th-century Korean painter, Hyewon. Original stored at Gansong Art Museum in Seoul, South Korea.

Serves 4

Ingredients

one 9-ounce package Buckwheat noodles
crushed ice

For the broth:

2 quarts beef broth
1/2 ounce dried shiitake mushrooms
1-2 teaspoons kelp powder
salt

Toppings:

4 hard boiled eggs
1 cucumber, seeds removed and cut into sticks
1 small daikon radish
1 Asian or bosc pear, cut into sticks, optional
sugar
rice vinegar
salt
ground chili flakes, to taste (optional)
kimchee (optional)

Garnishes:

mustard or sesame oil
rice vinegar

Method:

Add the dried mushrooms and kelp powder to the water and bring to a boil. Cover and simmer about 30 minutes, until flavorful. Refrigerate until cold (go ahead and leave the mushrooms to steep longer). After chilling give the broth a taste – cold food loses some flavor – you may need to add some seasoning.

Iced Korean Buckwheat Noodles | Mul-naengmyeon

Meanwhile:

Prepare the cucumber and daikon radish garnishes. Place each in their own bowl and add the sugar, salt, and vinegar, starting with 1/2 teaspoon at a time. Keep adding the sugar and vinegar until you get the sweet/tang you are looking for. I like somewhere between 1 and 2 teaspoons of vinegar and half as much sugar.  I generally go with about 1/4 teaspoon salt.

Add chili flakes to the cucumbers until they are spicy enough for your tastes (I liked a half teaspoon, for medium burn).

Slice up the pear right before serving or slice ahead and store in lemon water so the fruit doesn’t brown.

Iced Korean Buckwheat Noodles | Mul-naengmyeon

Next:

Cook the buckwheat noodles and rinse well (you’re looking to cool them down and rinse off the starch so they won’t be gummy).

To serve:

Divide the noodles among 4 bowls.

Ladle on the chilled broth, ice, and toppings, as desired. Season with vinegar (I like a lot!) and mustard oil or paste (I like a few drops).

Eat!!

Iced Korean Buckwheat Noodles | Mul-naengmyeon

Enjoy with a view of the flowers of Korea…

 

The Flower Village of Paju City by Ben Hur.

The Flower Village of Paju City by Ben Hur.

… What a dream!

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Korean naengmyeon is just that – a brothy, noodle soup topped with spicy cucumber, Asian pear, daikon radish, hard-boiled egg, and ice. While the soup starts out mild in flavor, adding vinegar, mustard oil (or paste), and even a spoonful of kimchee takes the soup to a whole new flavor profile – the catch is this seasoning is usually done at the table, so everyone can control how their naengmyeon tastes. Do you want it spicy? Sour? Heavy on the pear? The choice is yours.Iced Korean Buckwheat Noodles | Mul-naengmyeon
Servings
4people
Servings
4people
Ingredients
For the broth
Toppings
Instructions
  1. Add the dried mushrooms and kelp powder to the water and bring to a boil. Cover and simmer about 30 minutes, until flavorful. Refrigerate until cold (go ahead and leave the mushrooms to steep longer). After chilling give the broth a taste – cold food loses some flavor – you may need to add some seasoning.
  2. Meanwhile: Prepare the cucumber and daikon radish garnishes. Place each in their own bowl and add the sugar, salt, and vinegar, starting with 1/2 teaspoon at a time. Keep adding the sugar and vinegar until you get the sweet/tang you are looking for. I like somewhere between 1 and 2 teaspoons of vinegar and half as much sugar. I generally go with about 1/4 teaspoon salt.
  3. Add chili flakes to the cucumbers until they are spicy enough for your tastes (I liked a half teaspoon, for medium burn). Slice up the pear right before serving or slice ahead and store in lemon water so the fruit doesn’t brown.
  4. Next: Cook the buckwheat noodles and rinse well (you’re looking to cool them down and rinse off the starch so they won’t be gummy).
  5. To serve: Divide the noodles among 4 bowls. Ladle on the chilled broth, ice, and toppings, as desired. Season with vinegar (I like a lot!) and mustard oil or paste (I like a few drops).
Recipe Notes

Tips:

– I made my own seasoned broth, adding dried mushrooms and kelp powder, but if you’re in a hurry you could just use regular beef broth and call it a day. Doing this would make this a super fast weeknight meal.

– I got all the ingredients for this soup at my grocery store – the noodles and kelp powder were on the international aisle, the kimchee was refrigerated, and the daikon and asian pear were in the produce section.

– Try not to cut your noodles – slurping them whole is considered good luck. When purchasing the noodles, look for a combination of buckwheat and sweet potato flour – they provide the characteristic chewy/snap that makes the dish so fun to eat. In a pinch, regular buckwheat noodles can be substituted.

– You really don’t need all the toppings – that’s up to you. The key is to have fun and let your personality shine!

Source:

Recipe Copyright Sasha Martin, Global Table Adventure. For personal or educational use only.

corn around the world

Around the world in corn ~ 20 recipes to celebrate the harvest

Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

I can get behind a holiday in which corn on the cob is the star. The Green Corn Ceremony (a.k.a. The Busk) is just that – a Native American celebration marking the first corn harvest of the season… which usually occurs in August or September. Not only is The Busk a time to feast on corn in a variety of forms, it is a time to right old wrongs, clean the home, and purify the mind.

Mind. Belly. Spirit.

In honor of the harvest, I’ve gathered the dozens of corn recipes we tried when we cooked our way around the world. I invite you to try one of these recipes and share your photos on Instagram with #GlobalTableAdventure (be sure to include the people and food pics).  Let us know how it went! I’ll regram the yummiest ones! (And be sure to leave a comment below with what you’d most like to try!)

No passports required – by trying one of the recipes below, you can be where ever you’d like in… a… forkbeat!

 

Mealie Bread | SWAZILAND [Recipe]

The moistest, corn-blasted cornbread around. (with no cornflour in sight!)… Try it warm with a pat of butter!

Mealie Bread Recipe from Swaziland | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

 

Street Corn with Lime Juice, Chilies and Salt | KENYA [Recipe]

There’s almost nothing easier than rolling hot, grilled corn in salt, lime juice, and minced chili peppers… and it tastes amazing. Take a hint from the Kenyans and make it a staple in your life.

Kenyan Street Corn | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

Here’s a recipe card I made, if you want to pin it for later:

How to make Kenyan Street Corn

 

Fresh Corncakes with Cheese | Cachapas | VENEZUELA [Recipe]

Just three main ingredients: corn, masa harina, and an ooey gooey cheese like queso mano or mozzarella. Ready, set, get your stretch on!

Venezuelan Cachapas Recipe | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

Around the world in corn ~ 20 recipes to celebrate the harvest

 

Coconut Curried Corn | Galey iyo Qumbo | SOMALIA [Recipe]

Ohhh, Somalia! Serve up this curried corn at the next potluck… everyone will be happy with the luscious sauce – a blend of creamy coconut milk, turmeric, tomato sauce, and onion.

Coconut Curried Corn | Galey iyo Qumbo| Somalia | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

Spiced Elote | Mexican Corn on the Cob with cheese, chili powder & lime juice | MEXICO [Recipe]

Say Hola to lady Mexico with this standard street food – Rich, cheesy elote (don’t forget the chili powder). Not just tasty – this one’s a looker, too!

Spiced Elote | Mexican corn on the cob | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

Roasted Squash with Corn and Cheese | ZIMBABWE [Recipe]

The very last country we cooked on our quest to eat the world. This one is as good on the grill as it is in the oven, making it a year-round staple. One of my daughter Ava’s most requested side dishes!

Zimbabwe's Roasted Squash with corn and cheese | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

Potato and Corn Casserole | Pastel de papa con eliote | ARGENTINA [Recipe]

Comfort food deluxe… mashed potatoes with a pureed corn topping. I like the crusty bits on the edges!

Potato and Corn Casserole (Pastel de papa con eliote) | Argentina | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

 

Pancho | URUGUAY [Recipe]

Corn on a hot dog? In Uruguay they’d tell you… sí!

Pancho | Uruguay | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

Cheesy Cornbread with fried peppers | Sopa Paraguaya | PARAGUAY [Recipe]

Inside you’ll find tons of flavor thanks to fried peppers and onion with cottage cheese, monterey jack, and more. Practically a meal in itself!

Sopa Paraguaya | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

Grilled Corn with Coconut Milk | CAMBODIA [Recipe]

This is the big easy! Just corn and coconut milk! To mix things up, try adding a little sugar and chopped green onion to the coconut milk. (Thanks to reader Sophie S.W. for sharing this yummy suggestion on our Facebook page)

Cambodian Grilled Corn | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

Dutch Potato Salad | Huzarensalade  | THE NETHERLANDS [Recipe]

This one has it all: Ham, hard-boiled eggs, corn, gherkins, apples, and so much more. Perfect for a hot afternoon’s feast!

Dutch Potato Salad | The Netherlands | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

Irio | TANZANIA [Recipe]

This east African favorite is a classic on our tables now… mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, corn, peas and a whole lotta love!

Irio | Tanzania | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

Mealie Bread with Blackened Chilies | ZAMBIA [Recipe

This mildly spicy cornbread is GREAT with a bowl of piping hot chili. The pieces of corn make it even more irresistible.

Mealie Bread with Blackened Chilies | Zambia | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

Nigerian Curried Fried Rice | NIGERIA [Recipe]

Curry? Rice? Veggies? Fried???? Yes, please and thank you!

Nigerian Curried Fried Rice | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

Albanian Cornbread with Feta | ALBANIA [Recipe]

A bright, fresh cornbread featuring feta and green onion. Good enough to eat.

Albanian Cornbread with Feta | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

Corn with Plantains | CAMEROON [Recipe]

Here’s a nice, homey side dish from Cameroon. Cooked peppers, plantains, and corn… seasoned with red palm oil, a West African staple. Easy peasy!

Corn with Plantains | Cameroon | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

South American Chicken Casserole (Pastel del Choclo) | CHILE |  [Recipe]

A funky combination of chicken, egg, and olives under a sweet corn topping. A strange but utterly addictive combination that’ll have you smiling from ear to ear.

South American Chicen Casserole | Pastel del Choclo | Chile | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

Mamaliga | Dense Cornmeal “Bread” | MOLDOVA [Recipe]

Think polenta of sorts… but Moldovan… Serve it up with stewed meats and pickled veggies.

Maliga | Moldovan Cornbread | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

Corn on the Cob with Fried Cheese | BOLIVIA [Recipe]

Corn with cheese… it’s a theme, even in Bolivia.  There’s gotta be something to this trend!

bolivian-recipe

Sweet Corn Atol  | El Salvadore [Recipe]

And, yes, there’s even a lovely sweet drink made from corn called atol. All you’ll need is a blender and a smile… and you’ll be sippin’ pretty in no time!

Sweet Corn Atol | El Salvadore | Celebrate Corn season with 20 dishes from around the world

So many great recipes, so little time.

Perhaps, with all of us cooking, we can make them all!

So….

What recipe are you going to try with your family?

Leave a comment below so we can all be inspired!

spiced.elote.recipe.img_6046

Mexican corn on the cob | Spiced Elote

Spiced Elote | Mexican corn on the cob

A well-roasted corn kernel is smoky.  Chewy. Juicy. Irresistible.

This much, Mexicans know.

Some elote are cooked for hours inside clay ovens. They sit over shimmering coals until their bright yellow kernels turn deep, toasty brown and their husks turn brittle.*

Macedonio Alcalá Theater, Oaxaca by Ulises Estrada. Chichen Itza by Daniel Schwen..

Elote Macedonio Alcalá Theater, Oaxaca by Ulises Estrada. Chichen Itza by Daniel Schwen.

More simple recipes speed up the roasting process, but have triple-decker toppings: salty cotija cheese, rich mayonnaise (just enough to make the cheese stick), and smoky ancho chili powder.

Spiced Elote | Mexican corn on the cob

Then the whole cob is sprinkled with cilantro and a good puckering of fresh lime juice. The end result is an ear of corn that is practically a meal in itself.

Spiced Elote | Mexican corn on the cob


Spiced Elote | Mexican corn on the cob

Spiced Elote | Mexican corn on the cob

Spiced Elote | Mexican corn on the cob

Ultimately, the lime juice is what sold me on elote. Even a single, tart wedge does wonders to bring the richly spiced corn into relief… though I found myself squeezing much more on each cob. One bite satisfies me almost as well as a good margarita does.

My version of elote takes extra limes into consideration as well as an interesting technique from America’s Test Kitchen – adding the ancho chili powder before grilling in order to bloom the flavor.

Spiced Elote | Mexican corn on the cob

Friends, this recipe is a celebration of one simple fact: this is a quiet summer – and I insist it stay that way.

There’ll be no extra steps and definitely no fussy soaking of the corn. Next week I go through final proofs of my memoir before National Geographic sends it off to print. Once those are complete, I’m headed to visit my brothers and sister and their families… and I’m just going to… be.

With a bit of ocean on the side.

TOP: Arenas Bay by Cdw1952. BOTTOM: Bahia by Cdw1952.

TOP: Arenas Bay by Cdw1952. BOTTOM: Bahia de los Angeles, in the state of Baja California, Mexico. by Cdw1952.

Bahía de los Ángeles

Serves 4

Ingredients:

4 large ears corn, with husks still attached
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon ancho chile powder, plus more as needed
1/3 cup mayonnaise
1 1/2 cups crumbled cotija cheese
a handful fresh cilantro leaves, torn
salt
freshly ground black pepper
2 limes, cut into wedges

Method:

Peel back the corn husks and tie back (I used raffia). Pull off the silk and discard. Mix together the vegetable oil and chili powder, then brush onto corn husks.

Spiced Elote | Mexican corn on the cob

Grill over medium high until cooked through and nicely browned in areas, turning occasionally as needed. Position the husks away from the fire so they don’t burn. This should take about 20 minutes.

Spiced Elote | Mexican corn on the cob

Brush with mayonnaise (Many recipes use much more than I do. I have to say – the more you use, the more cheese will stick.). Then roll in the crumbled cheese.

Spiced Elote | Mexican corn on the cob

Sprinkle extra chili powder on the cobs if desired and douse with lime juice to taste.

Spiced Elote | Mexican corn on the cob

And Ava’s verdict?

Hmmm…

Spiced Elote | Mexican corn on the cob

But it’s messy mama…

Spiced Elote | Mexican corn on the cob

Oh well… here goes nothin’!

Spiced Elote | Mexican corn on the cob

One of the great joys of parenting is when she tries food she’s apprehensive about!

Now it’s your turn! Enjoy … perhaps with some carne asada or a fun Five-step mole poblano!

Yum, yum.

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Some elote are cooked for hours inside clay ovens. They sit over shimmering coals until their bright yellow kernels turn deep, toasty brown and their husks turn brittle.Mexican corn on the cob | Spiced Elote
Servings
4
Servings
4
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Peel back the corn husks and tie back (I used raffia). Pull off the silk and discard. Mix together the vegetable oil and chili powder, then brush onto corn husks.
  2. Grill over medium high until cooked through and nicely browned in areas, turning occasionally as needed. Position the husks away from the fire so they don't burn. This should take about 20 minutes.
  3. Brush with mayonnaise (Many recipes use much more than I do. I have to say - the more you use, the more cheese will stick.). Then roll in the crumbled cheese.
  4. Sprinkle extra chili powder on the cobs if desired and douse with lime juice to taste.
Source:

Recipe Copyright Sasha Martin, Global Table Adventure. For personal or educational use only.

recipes-and-ideas-to-use-up-watermelon

5 Global Recipes to dress up watermelon this summer

Recipes-and-ideas-to-use-up-watermelon

Thump the bottom of a watermelon and you thump millenia of history. The sound might be hollow, but the content is ripe. Origins of this hefty fruit trace back to Southern Africa, though fandom is widespread: even Egypt’s beloved boy Pharaoh Tutankhamen (a.k.a. King Tut) stashed away some watermelon seeds in his tomb to ensure an abundant (and refreshing) afterlife. Today, watermelon can be found all over the world and is especially beloved in Africa, Asia, and Oceania.

While the simplicity of a fat slice is always welcome, here are a few foolproof ways to add a touch of elegance to your watermelon experience:

1. Watermelon lemonade [Recipe]

West African Watermelon Lemonade | 5 Global Recipes to dress up watermelon

Watermelon and citrus grow abundantly in West Africa. When the fruit is in season, piles of melons line the streets. This naturally pink lemonade is a great, easy way to use up extra watermelon (or even that not-so-perfect specimen).  But, be warned this drink is hard to resist on a hot day – it’ll be gone before you know it! Try the recipe.

2. ‘Otai [Recipe]

'Otai from Tonga | 5 Global Recipes to dress up watermelon

Here’s anther drink – this time with texture – from Tonga in Oceania. Grated watermelon, coconut milk, and a tart squeeze of lime juice come together in this addictive Oceanic drink that’s more slushy than smoothie. Ironically, the slushy qualities are textural – there is no ice. Slurp your own today.

3. Watermelon Jam [Recipe]

 Watermelon Jam inspired by Turkmenistan | 5 Global Recipes to dress up watermelon

Central Asia loves watermelon so much, there are entire festivals devoted to the fruit. Even simple afternoon teas will include a bit of watermelon, sometimes in the form of jam as we learned when we cooked Turkmenistan. Making watermelon jam is surprisingly easy and a great way to capture the essence of summer for hostess gifts. Pop a jar open in the dead of winter and the room is bound to warm up. Let’s Jam.

4. Watermelon and feta [Recipe]

Jordanian snack | 5 Global Recipes to dress up watermelon

The salty/sweet combination of watermelon and feta might seem classic today, but there was a time that this was a purely “foreign” idea, inspired by the cuisine of the Middle East. We first experienced it whenever we cooked Jordan with the addition of pita bread… and were immediately hooked. Bite into the basics now.

5. Tizana [Recipe]

Tizana from Venezuela | 5 Global Recipes to dress up watermelon

Venezuelan fruit punch is incredible. Think fruit salad with the fresh flavor of orange juice and grenadine. Our superstar watermelon dances around in this soft pink drink with apples, grapes, banana, and pineapple… making every sip/bite a festival. No wonder Venezuelans keep some on hand in their refrigerators just about constantly! Create a punchbowl for your next party!

Photos: Square watermelon by laughlin from Tokyo, Japan. Truck of watermelons in Morocco by Makary.
egypt-birthday-party

How to throw an Egyptian themed birthday party

How to throw an Egyptian Themed Birthday Party

Walk the aisles of any party store and the selections are the same: overpriced plastic renditions of the latest Disney craze. But what would happen if I helped my child see there’s more to the world than someone else’s fairy tale?

What interests your child? Start there.

Ava’s Egyptian-themed birthday party came about in a round-about way… but it’s always been about what she loves.

About six months before her 5th birthday, I noticed she would often ask to read a book on gemstones that her Grammie gave her. She poured over each drawing, asking me to list which gemstone was which. Soon, she knew our birthstones by heart – ruby and moonstone.

Looking to build on her interest in Geology, I introduced her to Archaeology… the art of digging up artifacts from historical sites. We took several books out of the library about ancient Egypt in particular.

How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

Observing her continued fascination with the “dig,” I asked her if she would like to do some sort of dig for her birthday party and she enthusiastically agreed.  It would be a gemstone AND an artifact dig, she decided.

Oh, and she really, really wanted to camp out.

From there the plans took off.

How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

TIP: As you read along you’ll see lots of tips, tricks, and a few printables. I put everything together (with several improvements) in an easy to download guide so you can recreate this party for your own family:

Egyptian Birthday Party Resource Kit

The Location

A beach and campsite about 30 minutes from Tulsa, Oklahoma, on Lake Oologah, otherwise known as “Egypt by the Nile.”

The Invitations

How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party | DIY Invitation

Most of our invitations were done with a Facebook Event page one month before the party. We also handmade invitations for a handful of Ava’s closest friends. I found a Hieroglyphic Key online and let Ava use it to draw the word “party.” I then color copied and cut out her designs. We glued it to card stock along with  more specific details (found on the inside).

We also included the hieroglyphic key on the back of the card so her friends could have fun drawing their own names.  We dropped these off at our friends’ homes 2-3 weeks before the party.

The Dig

How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party | DIY Artifact Dig

Ava and I spent one afternoon on a blanket at our local arboretum making artifacts out of polymer clay. I brought a cookie sheet and after each artifact was formed, we placed it on the sheet. When we got home we baked our treasures to harden and protect.

We made lots of gemstones, pendants, beads, as well as some items inspired by real Egyptian artifacts we found in library books, such as a King Tut, a sphinx, a statue of a cat, a hippo, and more. Ava got into making tornadoes and bowls, too… the photo above only shows half of the artifacts we made!

I decided to photocopy our inspiration pictures and glue them on a sheet of paper. This became a guide to go with the bigger artifacts so that the children could read up on what they’d dug up.

Oh, and no worries if your children make “unidentifiable” shapes – we invited the children to imagine what these more indistinguishable items might have been used for (that’s the job of a good archaeologist after all!).

DIY Archeological Dig | How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

On the day of the dig we gave the children baskets I purchased at the local thrift store. They used them both for sifting the sand from the artifacts as well as to store their finds. While we could have done the dig by the beach, we did it up by our campsite while the “birthday cakes” were cooking (more on that later).

DIY Archeological Dig | How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

DIY Archeological Dig | How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

The Favors

Since our Egyptian-themed favors were a little unusual, I included a description with them. You can see it rolled up and attached to the goodie bags with raffia.

DIY Goody Bags | How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

DIY Goody Bags | How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

Licorice Root 

This was fun because the kids were all “why is there a stick in my favor bag”… but I explained to them they could chew it or pop it in a pot of hot water to make tea. Just like they do in Egypt (Ancient Egyptians treasured licorice root for its natural sweetness, rich flavor and restorative properties).  I found these for 10 cents each at our local Renaissance Fair, but I bet you could find them at a good spice shop – call around or browse online.

Tattoos

Did you know that Egyptian woman are credited with having some of the earliest tattoos in the world, from over four thousand years ago!? These peace sign tattoos were sent in by Ava’s Uncle G. Perfect timing! 

Egyptian Trail Mix & Sesame Candies

A mix of Egypt’s favorite snacks: almonds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, dried apricots, and golden raisins.

Honey Sticks

Ancient Egyptians thought honey could cure a toothache. Pharaohs were even buried with pots of honey.  Archaeologists, excavating their tombs, found pots of honey, thousands of years old. The honey was still fresh!

Glow Sticks

Last but not least, every archaeologist needs a little light! The glow sticks will help guide the children on future adventures! (Be careful to identify these as non-edible, since they look a lot like honey sticks.)

Party Favors | How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

Ava helped assemble the goodie bags the night before, at our campsite…though there was still a bit of work leftover after she crashed out in the tent!

Party Favors | How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

The Food

The Menu | How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

egypt-1

Authentic Egyptian Menu | How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

The menu was camping meets Egypt…. it had to hold up in hot weather and be refreshing. Thankfully that’s the goal in Egypt, too, where temperatures can soar up to to 104F during the day.

Popcorn

Though mentions of “corn” in the pyramids probably referred to barley, popcorn is now a popular treat in East Africa, often served with coffee.

Nuts & Fruits

Roasted nuts such as almonds, pistachios, and dried seeds are sold from pushcarts all over Egypt. On hot days a juicy slice of watermelon and dried figs or apricots cool off the weariest wanderer.

Hibiscus & Pomegranate Tea

Hibiscus from Upper Egypt is considered among the world’s finest and is particularly wonderful with another beloved Egyptian fruit – the pomegranate.

Basboosa [Recipe]

A traditional semolina cake made with orange blossom water, lemon juice, rose water, and ghee. The texture is unusually moist thanks to an overnight soak in lemon and rose water syrup.

Orange Campfire Cake (see below)

Oranges grow up and down the Nile, making Egypt one of the world’s greatest producers of the fruit. In honor of this yummy crop, each family baked a cake inside an orange to share.

Basboosa Cake | How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

Orange Campfire Cakes

Oranges grow really well on the banks of the Nile – so well, in fact, that Egypt is one of the world’s greatest producers of oranges. I thought it’d be fun to help the kids celebrate this amazing fruit by doing a little campfire cake.

How to bake a campfire cake:

We cut the tops off the oranges, hollowed them out with grapefruit spoons, and added vanilla cake batter inside (from a box is fine – the batter from one box will fill 10-12 oranges).

We then popped on the top, wrapped the oranges tightly in foil and cooked them on the hot embers for 30-35 minutes (cooking times will vary depending on how hot your campfire is).

It really helped to have the foil precut and have a couple of adults help hollow the oranges. The pulp makes a great mixed drink for the adults (just add rum and ice!).

Orange Campfire Cakes | How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

It’s hard to overcook these cakes since the orange skin protects the cake batter – so even if it burns, the cake inside is still moist and tender

Orange Campfire Cakes | How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

How to cook Orange Campfire Cakes | How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

Orange Campfire Cakes | How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

Orange Campfire Cakes | How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

kids-eating-camfire-cake

Orange Campfire Cakes | How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

Lesson Learned:

Birthdays don’t have to be expensive look-a-likes in order to be memorable. 

In the end, Ava’s Egyptian themed birthday party was incredibly fun. Many parents echoed the sentiment, saying it was the best party they’d ever been to. Cooking the cakes in oranges was a definite highlight, though the artifact dig was a close second. 

In all honesty, there was nothing super complicated about this party. Decor was handmade or picked up at the library or thrift store… even the goodie bags were just brown paper lunch bags. The table cloths didn’t match. But everything went together in a shabby-chic sort of way… and the theme was love.

Best of all? Ava had a blast.

I may have peaked with this party planning thing… until Ava has her next awesome idea!

 

Here’s an instant download with everything we used for the party: 

 

Egyptian Birthday Party Resource Kit

 

This download includes the Dig Guide, Goodie Bag Content Description, Egyptian Menu, along with basic instructions, decor ideas, and invitation ideas. The documents have been updated and improved to have papyrus looking paper and other fun details.

How to throw an Egyptian-themed birthday party

(Whole drawing) Procession of figures with offerings; part of a wall-painting from the tenth tomb at Gourna, Thebes. Made during an expedition to Egypt organised by Robert Hay between 1826 and 1838.

(Whole drawing) Procession of figures with offerings; part of a wall-painting from the tenth tomb at Gourna, Thebes. Made during an expedition to Egypt organised by Robert Hay between 1826 and 1838.

You may be surprised what happens when you ask your child about their interests:

Their birthday party may take a turn for the better!

What do you love about the best birthday parties you’ve been to (kids or adults)?

What did they do right? What did they do differently?

* Photo of Nofretete by Philip Pikart.

 

P.S. I’m happy to spread the Egyptian love… which means a GIVEWAY!

HOW TO WIN:  If anyone can use our painted Egyptian sheet that we used for a backdrop behind or buffet, I’ll be happy to mail it to you! If more than one person wants it, I’ll give it away to a random commenter. Just leave me a comment as to why you’d like it!

Good luck :)  

 

pickled-figs

Homemade Balsamic Figs | Entertaining the Italian way

How to make Balsamic Pickled Figs

A daydream worth dreaming

Cobblestone alleys flanked by weathered walls. Hilltop churches. Sunlight warm on fig trees and grapevines.  This is the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy.

Deep in the cellars there’s Parmesan, balsamic, and prosciutto aging. They slumber in the dim recesses, the nuttiness and salt growing bolder, rounder. Waiting for the perfect moment to shine.

Waiting to become the perfect bite.

Photo of the Secchia River by Roberto Ferrari from Campogalliano (Modena), Italy.

Photo of the Secchia River by Roberto Ferrari from Campogalliano (Modena), Italy.

And by perfect I don’t mean fancy.

I mean perfectly un-fussed.

How to make Balsamic Pickled Figs

The Art of Un-fussing

When it comes to entertaining, I constantly have to remind myself to un-fuss.

My friends don’t have fancy expectations – they want laughter.

No one minds if elbows are on the table,  as long as there’s a drink in every hand.

And when it comes to food? The simpler the better.

How to make Balsamic Pickled Figs and un-fussy antipasto.

The perfect bite

I could take a lesson from the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. There, antipasto is a way of life.

Antipasto is the embodiment of the pefect, unfussed bite: A leathery bit of dried fruit or the sweet squish of fresh fruit. A pluck of cheese and a shaving of meat. Some sort of soft pickled thing and a crispy crust.

In Emilia-Romagna, even the most ordinary antipasti are laden with the best of their local harvest  – figs wrapped in prosciutto, perhaps some microgreens, a drizzle of balsamic on a hunk of Parmesan. 

Place it on a board, call it a day. Something for everyone. 

The magic of Balsamic

This week Whole Journeys, Whole Food Market’s amazing new travel division, challenged me to pickle something incredible with balsamic vinegar from Modena, a province of Emilia Romagna… to help bring in the summery goodness of Emilia-Romagna to light.

What an honor! And what fun!!

Balsamic vinegar from Modena

Whole Journeys is all about lo-key tours centered around the ingredients Whole Foods Market sources, in the countries where they source them. Think bicycle rides through the Italian country side, exploring markets and farms …all while cooking and tasting the best ingredients. And, of course, they have a tour of Emilia-Romagna coming up this fall, featuring local wines, step-by-step making of balsamic vinegar, Parmigiano-Reggiano, and Proscuitto di Parma.

I immediately knew what I had to do: marry the most beautiful ingredients in the region with Homemade Balsamic Figs.

Fresh Brown Figs

A seasonal delight

For the Whole Journeys challenge I picked up a pound of fresh Brown Figs, making sure the fruit was heavy and the skin velvety. Figs are in season right now – tender, mildly sweet bites of summer. 

A few nicks here and there told me the skin was fragile – one telltale sign of ripeness. Still – they figs should be fairly firm so as to not fall apart when pickled.

How to make Balsamic Pickled Figs.

After a quick boil in honey and a pucker of balsamic vinegar, the figs find the perfect sweet/tart balance. But it’s the rosemary and thyme infusion that makes the figs and their thin syrup hum… a fresh, earthy note, as though they were plucked from the trees moments ago.

And darned if I can’t shut my eyes when I’m eating them and imagine myself in Italy.

Antipasto Salad

What to do with pickled figs

  • Antipasto-inspired Salad: fill a platter with peppery leaves of arugula. Top with shaved parmesan, rolls of proscuitto, cracked black pepper, and slices of pickled figs. Fresh strawberries are a bonus. Drizzle with pickling liquid and olive oil. You can see my rendition on Instagram.
  • Snacks: As the weeks go by, the ripest figs will soften into the pickling liquid. Smash them on a cracker or over a salty piece of Parmesan.
  • Hostess Gift: Have a friend that loves figs or balsamic vinegar?  A small jar of pickled figs will wow them. Bonus? Bring some on the antipasto salad to share (and convince them of the figs’ winning flavor), then give your friend their own jar as a parting gift.
  • Sweet Balsamic Fig Salad Dressing: The leftover pickling liquid can be used to make the most divine salad dressing. Just add olive oil and season with salt and fresh cracked pepper!
  • Prosecco Mixer: Add a drizzle of the honey-infused pickling liquid to a cold, bubbly glass of Prosecco. This treatment is inspired by the folks in Emilia-Romagna who add straight balsamic to their glasses. Ah-mazing.

How to spike prosecco with balsamic vinegar

THE GIVEAWAY

UPDATE: Congratulations to reader, Kelly D.! After running everyone through Random.org, she’s our lucky winner! Send me an email to claim your gift certificate, Kelly :)

I invite you to capture the essence of Emilia-Romagna yourself… especially the art of un-fussing your feasts. To help with this, one lucky winner will get a $50 Whole Foods Shopping Spree to create the un-fussed antipasto of their dreams… thanks to the generosity of Whole Journeys.

How to win:

1. Leave a comment on this page and tell me how you un-fuss your feasts – especially how you keep entertaining simple during the summer.

2. Share this post on your favorite social media (Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, or Twitter) and link to it in your comment for an extra entry.

3. That’s it!

The contest runs through Wednesday, July 16, 2014. A winner will be chosen at random the next day.

How to pickle figs

Balsamic Pickled Figs with Fresh Herbs & Honey
Recipe inspired by Food & Wine.

Ingredients:

One quart canning jar OR three to four 1/2 pint canning jars with lids and rings
1 1/4 cups honey
2 cups water
3/4 cup balsamic vinegar
1  pound small firm-but-ripe fresh brown figs (18-20)
1 teaspoon black peppercorns
a sprig rosemary and/or thyme per jar

Method:

Sterilize the jars and tongs.

Prepare jars, lids, and tongs by running through the sterilize setting on the dishwasher or covering them with water and boiling for 10 minutes. Do not remove from sanitized pot or dishwasher until needed.

How to sterilize jars for pickling

Cook the figs

Place the  honey, water, and balsamic vinegar in a pot ad bring to a boil. Add the figs, simmer 1-2 minutes, and remove from heat.

Jar & season the figs

Divide the figs evenly among the jars with sterile tongs. Cover with cooking liquid (leave about 1/4 inch at the top of the jar). Divide the peppercorns and herbs between jars. Attach lids.

Tip: If there’s any extra cooking liquid, save it as the base for a fantastic salad dressing!

Cook the figs again

Boil a large pot with water. Place the sealed jars in the pot, completely submerging them. Start a timer and boil this way for about 10 minutes. Let rest in the hot water about five minutes, then remove with tongs and let cool at room temperature.

Check the seal

The next day make sure each lid is sealed (there should be no flex up or down when you push down on the lid (same as with a tamper proof lid). Store in a cool, dry and dark place for up to 12 months. Tip: If jars have not sealed refrigerate immediately and eat them up within a week.

Enjoy!

A recipe for Pickled Figs

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Homemade Balsamic Figs | Entertaining the Italian way
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Sterilize the jars and tongs. Prepare jars, lids, and tongs by running through the sterilize setting on the dishwasher or covering them with water and boiling for 10 minutes. Do not remove from sanitized pot or dishwasher until needed.
  2. Cook the figs Place the honey, water, and balsamic vinegar in a pot ad bring to a boil. Add the figs, simmer 1-2 minutes, and remove from heat.
  3. Jar & season the figs Divide the figs evenly among the jars with sterile tongs. Cover with cooking liquid (leave about 1/4 inch at the top of the jar). Divide the peppercorns and herbs between jars. Attach lids. Tip: If there’s any extra cooking liquid, save it as the base for a fantastic salad dressing!
  4. Cook the figs again Boil a large pot with water. Place the sealed jars in the pot, completely submerging them. Start a timer and boil this way for about 10 minutes. Let rest in the hot water about five minutes, then remove with tongs and let cool at room temperature.
  5. Check the seal The next day make sure each lid is sealed (there should be no flex up or down when you push down on the lid (same as with a tamper proof lid). Store in a cool, dry and dark place for up to 12 months. Tip: If jars have not sealed refrigerate immediately and eat them up within a week.
Recipe Notes

You'll need one quart canning jar OR three to four 1/2 pint canning jars with lids and rings

Source:

Recipe Copyright Sasha Martin, Global Table Adventure. For personal or educational use only.