Menu: Kazakhstan

Cabo loved his scraps as much as the next cat, which is why I know he would have endorsed this Kazakh saying:

“Meat brings strength, shurpa brings beauty” (as found in Please to the Table).

If he could speak, he probably would have used it anytime the grill was on (although he was known to love watermelon, too).

I can hear him now:

“MMmmmmeow, that smells good. Can I have some? Purrrrlease? You know, the Kazakh’s will tell ya – meat brings strength, shurpa brings beauty. Mmmmeow.

I’ll miss that silly cat.

With that being said, today is a good day for a filling, replenishing meal. A menu as good for celebrations as it is for mourning. A selection both comforting and nourishing. Plus, this grouping is filled with fun words – just saying them will bring joy into your day.

What sounds good to you?

Central Asian Noodle Stew (Lagman Shurpa) [Recipe]
A blend of thick, homemade noodles, stir-fried lamb and veggies, finished in a light broth. A sprinkling of fresh basil sends it over the edge. Perfect comfort food for a fall afternoon.

Homemade noodles (Lagman) [Recipe]
All you need is a rolling pin and a knife for these simple egg noodles. Lagman are said to be the cousin of lomein.

Chak Chak [Recipe]
Homemade noodles fried in butter and coated in a honey syrup. The end result sticks together like rice krispie treats, but tastes bee-liscious.

Salty  Salty Tea [Recipe]
It’s true. Stay tuned.

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Comments

  1. Noodles that I don’t need a pasta maker for? Tell me more. . .

  2. The noodle stew looks interesting ! Home-made noodles, lamb, herbs… I can’t wait to try it !

  3. Central Asia is a backwater today but in ancient times it was a cultural crossroads. Trade in both goods and ideas between China, India and Europe passed through this area, which includes not only Kazakhstan but all the central Asian countries you’ll visit on this culinary odyssey. Cosmopolitan cities grew as a result of this commerce and cultural ferment. In Kazakhstan, trade passed through the city of Taraz. The old Silk Road cities were inhabited by Caucasians related to Persians. By about 1300, they were displaced (and I believe assimilated) by Turkic people. The Kazakhs were a union of several Turkic peoples. They formed a big empire about 1450, the Kazakh Khanate, which is the basis for modern Kazakhstan, which is the largest landlocked country in the world.

  4. The K’s already! I joined your adventure in Belize and that feels like yesterday. The Kazakhstan menu looks delicious, and perfect for the season.

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