Recipe: Ethiopian Lamb & Onion Stew (Awaze Tibs)

Serves 2-4

I was a total lamb newb before starting Global Table Adventure – I simply had never cooked it. Sure, I grew up eating it with mint jelly (although the jelly always stayed on my plate, untouched), but the actual process of making a tasty meal out of lamb was a mystery to me. Thanks to our Adventure, it’s becoming rather second nature and this Ethiopian recipe might be my favorite lamb recipe thus far (barely edging out the Roast Lamb from Cyprus).

Our recipe is adapted from Laura Kelley of Silk Road Gourmet, a most wonderful author and world traveler. Serve with Injera.

Ingredients:

1/8 cup peanut oil
2 red onions, chopped
1 inch fresh ginger, peeled and grated (about 1 1/2 tsp)
3 cloves garlic, crushed
2 tsp berberé
1 cup beef stock
1.2 lbs cubed lamb

yogurt, to taste

Method:

Chop the onions (you can do a large dice or strips) and cook them until golden (10-15 min) over medium high, or until you can no longer stand how good the house smells. Take your time getting them nice and golden – that’s where all the flavor is.

Meanwhile, grate the ginger. Grating is the best way to get rid of those tough fibers and helps the ginger to “disappear” into the dish.

Add the ginger and crushed garlic to the pan and cook a few more minutes.

Toss in the berberé. Two teaspoons made me sweat… in a good way. Much more and I might have passed out.

Add the meat and brown it.

Cover with beef stock and simmer partially covered for about 35 minutes, or until the lamb is tender. If you’d like a less soupy texture simmer uncovered.

Don’t forget to season it with plenty of salt and pepper.

Awaze Tibs is incredible. Serve with a dollop of plain yogurt, to cool the mouth after each bite.

While the meal looks brown, brown, brown…the taste is incredibly complex and addicting.

Happiness is finding the perfect balance between sweet and spicy.

Serve hot with injera to friends. Laugh a lot while eating it. Use your fingers.

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Comments

  1. Looks great Sasha!

    Can’t wait to read your review!

    Will provide a link on my site as well!

    Laura

    • Many thanks for the recipe. Although I was born in Ethiopia I grow up in England with an adopted family and I do enjoy Ethiopian food yet none of the Ethiopian restaurants in London sell a recipe book fortunately for me I found your site. I have cooked it according to your blog and may I say it testes great. Mind you I had to drive far just to get all the ingredients. Keep it up.

      Wishing you sunnier times.

  2. I’m not confident with lamb as well, since until a couple of years ago I did not like it at all. Now I am cautiously starting to eat it, but never cooked it. This looks like the perfect place to start.

  3. The photography is wonderful…as always…

  4. OO looks so good!! I love lamb. And all that juice soaked up w that injera!

  5. I can’t believe it, but I was just searching for an Ethiopian lamb recipe, and found this one on your site via Google! I had bought some teff flour last week, and out conversation at Homefries U about Ethiopian food inspired me to give it a shot. I’m fermenting the injera batter right now, and will give this a try later this week. I really enjoyed meeting you this weekend, and am looking forward to sampling many more of your recipes. I hope your flight home went well.

Trackbacks

  1. […] Recipe: Ethiopian Lamb & Onion Stew (Awaze Tibs) – Global Table …Mar 13, 2011 … Recipe: Ethiopian Lamb & Onion Stew (Awaze Tibs) … Awaze Tibs is incredible. Serve with a dollop of plain yogurt, to cool the mouth after … […]

  2. […] Lamb Chops, Spicy Chicken and Peanut Soup (from West Africa), Maple Glazed Rutabaga (Finland), Ethiopian Lamb Stew (Awaze Tibs). All these dishes are so simple to throw together and big on […]

  3. […] food, so I bravely ate around seven bites and then spent the rest chowing down on my sister’s awaze tibs, contemplating death by E. […]

  4. […] the berbere spice rub or the awaze (red pepper sauce). Then you can try awesome recipes like this Ethiopian Lamb & Onion Stew which call for the elusive berbere spice. […]

  5. […] the berbere spice rub or the awaze (red pepper sauce). Then you can try awesome recipes like this Ethiopian Lamb & Onion Stew which call for the elusive berbere spice. […]

  6. […] I first learned about Gorraasa from Mark Tanner who spent quite a bit of time traveling through Sudan, though I found his recipe needed adjusting to work in my kitchen. Namely, more baking powder was needed to obtain the open holes (and if the batter happened to be too wet, the holes would pop before they set). Also, I found that, though he suggested flipping the Gorraasa while cooking, when I did so, the results no longer matched the photo he provided (which is of a Sudanese woman making them). My experience of other flatbreads in the region suggests that most of them, in fact, are not flipped (like the lahooh/laxoox and Injera). […]

  7. […] the berbere spice rub or the awaze (red pepper sauce). Then you can try awesome recipes like this Ethiopian Lamb & Onion Stew which call for the elusive berbere spice. […]

  8. […] be great with lentils and other legumes. I’ve used it with our Doro Wat (chicken stew) and Awaze Tibs (lamb stew) recipes. A few sprinkles would also be great in our Lentil […]

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