Breaded and Fried Pork Cutlet | Wiener Schnitzel vom Schwein

This very large plate makes it hard to tell that this Wiener Schnitzle is about 8″ in diameter!

Serves 2

Wiener Schnitzel will fill you up after a long day hiking, skiing, or swimming. Enjoy this Austrian dish with potatoes or Nocken.

Ingredients:

2 pork cutlets

1/2 cup flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper
2 eggs
1/2 cup bread crumbs
1 tsp parsley
1 tsp paprika

olive oil
lemon slices

Method:

1. Place flour, salt and pepper in a dish. In another dish, place whisked eggs. In a third dish, place bread crumbs, parsley, and paprika.  Whisk.

Dip pork into breadcrumbs, egg, and flour.

2. Place cutlets between plastic wrap and pound with a mallet until about a 1/2″ to 1/4″ thick. Cut several small slits  around the edges to prevent curling.

TIP: Ask your butcher to pound the cutlets thin for you. Even if they don’t get them as thin as you want, you’ll  be ahead of the game.

Pork cutlet nearly doubles in width after being flattened with a mallet.

3. Dredge cutlets, first in flour, then in egg, and finally in bread crumb mixture.

Coated and ready to chill out for an hour.

4. Cover and refrigerate cutlets for at least an hour.

5. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium high. Saute cutlets for about 4 minutes per side, or until golden and cooked through.

Make sure the oil is hot and sizzles.

Almost diner time!

Almost Dinnertime!

6. Place cutlets in a warm oven or serve immediately with lemon slices.

 

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Wiener Schnitzel will fill you up after a long day hiking, skiing, or swimming. Enjoy this Austrian dish with potatoes or Nocken.Breaded and Fried Pork Cutlet | Wiener Schnitzel vom Schwein
Servings
2people
Servings
2people
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Place flour, salt and pepper in a dish. in another dish, place whisked eggs. In a third dish, place bread crumbs, parsley, and paprika. Whisk.
  2. Place cutlets between plastic wrap and pound with a mallet until about a 1/2" to 1/4" thick. Cut several small slits around the edges to prevent curling.
  3. Dredge cutlets, first in flour, then in egg, and finally in bread crumb mixture.
  4. Cover and refrigerate cutlets for at least an hour.
  5. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium high. Saute cutlets for about 4 minutes per side, or until golden and cooked through.
  6. Place cutlets in a warm oven or serve immediately with lemon slices.
Recipe Notes

TIP: Ask your butcher to pound the cutlets thin for you. Even if they don’t get them as thin as you want, you’ll be ahead of the game.

Source:

Recipe Copyright Sasha Martin, Global Table Adventure. For personal or educational use only.

12 Comments

  1. ken says

    sorry to be picky tonight, but isnt wienerschnitzel supposed to be veal?

    and with pork cutlets, if one wants to do it themselves, just buy boneless country ribs and cut them in half (long way) and pound them yourself. Not the huge plate sized schnitzel one gets in germany, but easier to cook and portion for a non-overeating american meal.

    • Hey there Ken!

      You are mostly right. Traditionally, Schnitzel is veal. I, however, did the version “Von Schwein” which means “with pork.”

      Austrians eat Schnitzel this way too.

      I’m glad to have your pickiness, keeps me on my toes! I’ll add a line to the description to clarify.

      • Ferdinand steyer says

        Being Austrian, my parents are from Wien I was born in the mountains, Wiener Schnitzel in Wien (Vienna) is always from Kalb (veal).
        Outside of Vienna it’s almost always from Schwein (pork).
        Sorry, but German comments on Austrian cooking are not really acceptable. Haha…
        Anyway, my comment is cooking and preparation related. Two things : never have I myself, nor have I heard about, putting the breaded Schnitzel in a fridge. Leaving the batter, flour, bread crumb mix sitting for any length will make it pasty and heavy tasking. In the process the breading will will not bubble up, as is necessary for a good Schnitzel. In addition the Schnitzel needs to completely float in hot oil. Vegetable oil, corn oil, etc.
        What you show isn’t much different from any Italian cutlet.
        Sorry for being so hard on you, but good Wiener Schnitzel is an amazing dish only if prepared right.

    • renee says

      I would have to say that about 90% of the wiener schnitzel i have eaten has been pork. Either way…it is very tasty isn’t it…

  2. LOL Here in Germany, I have yet to come across an schnitzel made of veal, and not pork (except at one fancy hotel). Here on the menus when it’s says Wiener Schnitzel, it is plain like this with pork, and lemon (“Vienna style”). But where are the pommes!! I don’t think I’ve ever seen it without “mit pommes”. 😀 I really dig all the gravies the Germans add. Jaeger schnitzel, schnitzel Rahm Champignons, Schweizer schnitzel (no gravy, but topped with sliced ham and cheese melted on top). Our local Gastatte even has one called Western schnitzel (mit bohnen und speck or beans and bacon). It’s also delicious with spatzle or kroketten. Have you made kroketten, or are they strictly German and not Austrian?

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  7. Rafal says

    Being a great food passionate and even greater Vienner Schnitzel fan, I must add my comment here. Although the dish you prepared is clearly very nice it is not a Vienner Schnitzel and I must protest. It’s not even the pork thing but the whole process. Traditionally the Vienner Schnitzel is from veal and although the pork version is more popular outside of Vienna and in whole Germany it is not a traditional one. You’ve added “…vom Shwein” and this closes that subject for me. However, there is more to go as it comes to a proper Vienner Schnitzel. First of all the thickness. 1/2″ to 1/4″? Never!!! That’s monstrous thickness. Vienner Schitzel should be precisely 3mm, that is I think around 1/8″. Thinner will dry out and thicker will make the batter burn before the meat is cooked through (as it – I’m sorry – shows on your picture). The colour should be identical everywhere – light brown, like gold with no brown or darker spots. Putting the meat into fridge before sautéing? Never!!! As Ferdinand said – this kills the batter which should be fluffy and actually separate itself a bit from the meat during sautéing. As a matter a fact this is a general rule not only related to the Schnitzel. You always sauté meat in room temperature. Sautéing the Vienner in oil? Never!!! Especially not the olive oil. There are no olives growing in Austria making the olive oil not a traditional cooking fat there. This is curtail and makes the whole difference in the flavour of the proper Vienner Schitzel. It should be sautéed in a really generous amount of clarified butter. It’s something between sautéing and frying actually. The only execution is pork fat here. Nothing else. Lastly, it’s very important to aerate the meat during sautéing by rapidly moving the pan from time to time and making the fat waves to cover the meat from above. This makes the batter goes a little fluffy. And this all makes it, what the truly perfect Vienner Schnitzel is and should be. Try and You’ll really feel the difference. Huge difference. I’m not complaining here. I really like your web site and admire your passion for food (especially that mine is similar). Preparing food is and should be fun. I would like the recipes here to be as good and accurate as possible. Let’s keep the internet free of the not perfect Vienner Schnitzels 🙂 Wish You all the best.

  8. I make this Weiner Schnitzel along with the KasNocken tonight. Great recipe! Thanks Sasha for providing this roadmap to culinary adventure.

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