All posts filed under: Colombia

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Go Global with 8 Edible Hiding Spots for your Easter Eggs

An Easter Tradition Easter Eggs are a thing in our house. We dye them. We decorate them. We gobble them up in two’s (it’s funny how a purple or green shell can make an ordinary egg taste eggstraordinary). When I was little Mom hid these boiled treats in the yard and, after we found them we ate them, still-warm from the sun. Today plastic eggs have taken over – probably because of one too many tummy aches after an overly hot Easter. But the kids don’t seem to notice; they scramble to collect these plastic shells, cracking them open to reveal stickers, coins, and candy. Each year the plastic eggs become more elaborate. Now they aren’t simply eggs, they’re monkeys or giraffes, baseballs or footballs. It’s fun, yes, but also starting to feel a bit… gimmicky. In the spirit of getting back to basics – to those real Easter Eggs of my childhood, I considered safe ways I could “hide” eggs for my daughter to find. Since it was 84F last week I knew the back yard …

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Monday Meal Review: Colombia

“What’s a poached egg” Mr Picky asked me. “Hold on a second,” I said, cracking the crooked egg into a dish. The egg was laid just two days ago from our friend’s chicken. Hence it was crooked. The yolk was brilliant gold… almost orange. I thought about how runny the yolk would be after poaching. How creamy and delicious. And I thought about how much Mr Picky hates runny eggs. Or claims he hates them. After all, I’ve never seen him eat a runny egg yolk, so who knows if he’s ever actually tried one. “The egg white will be set, but the yolk will be…” “Runny?” he interrupted, with a grimace. “Yes. Give me a minute and you’ll see.” I slipped the egg gently into the steaming milk and watched as it quickly dove beneath the surface. He snapped a few pictures. After a few minutes I began fishing around with my spoon. Seconds later, I found the egg beneath the milky white broth. I fished it out and ladled it onto a bed of thinly sliced …

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Colombian Oatmeal Smoothie | Avena

Makes 1 liter of “concentrate” Sweet and thick oatmeal drink can be made ahead for stress-free (and kid-friendly) brunch. Simply thin with extra milk before serving. Ingredients: 1/2 cup oatmeal 4 cups milk (plus extra for thinning drink) 1/4 cup brown sugar 1/2 tsp cinnamon Method: Heat milk in a large pot. Bring to a simmer… Add oatmeal. I used “3 minute” Irish oatmeal. Season with a big dollop of cinnamon. Smells like autumn joy. Then add sugar – white or brown, your preference. Simmer for about 10 minutes and then give a buzz with an immersion blender. You could also puree it in a regular blender too. Chill in the fridge. When ready to drink, add extra milk to thin to desired consistency and stir. Serve with some extra cinnamon and a big grin. After all, you just made the tastiest drink in town! 12345 Votes: 0 Rating: 0 You: Rate this recipe! Sweet and thick oatmeal drink can be made ahead for stress-free (and kid-friendly) brunch. Simply thin with extra milk before serving.Colombian …

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Creamy Avocado Dressing | Vinagreta de Aguacate

Makes about 1 cup Thick and rich, this dressing will add South American flavor to any salad. Also, try it as a dip. Ingredients: 2 avocados 2 limes, juiced 2 Tbsp white wine vinegar 1/2 cup olive oil (or to taste) salt pepper 1 Tbsp chopped cilantro Method: Scoop the flesh of two ripe avocados into a blender. These ones were so ripe, they were buttery-good. Add the juice of of two limes. There’s no substitute for the tart zing of lime juice. And a healthy pinch of fresh cilantro for even more South American flavor. You don’t have to chop it too finely because the blender will help you out. Thank goodness for modern appliances. Season with salt and pepper. Blend things up a bit. While the machine is still running, pour some olive oil through that peep hole in the top of your blender. Oh and don’t forget a splash of vinegar for a little extra pucker. Spoon into a serving bowl and use on salads or as a dip for veggies or …

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Coca Cola Rice | Arroz con Cola

Serves 2-4 Ahhh… nothing like a nice glass of cola. But what about in rice? The slightly sweet taste will leave you begging for more, especially when served with spicy food (as is common in Colombia). Ingredients: olive oil 1 small onion, chopped 1 cup rice 1 cup broth or water 1 cup cola salt pepper Method: Add a little oil to a small pot. Olive oil makes the world go round. Heat over medium and add chopped onion. Stir and cook for about five minutes. Once they are soft and starting to turn golden, add rice. Stir and cook another few minutes, until rice is hot. Add stock… (or water)… And some cola. Beware the fizzies. Mmm. Drink the leftovers. Or use it to make a Brazilian Mocha Cola! Add salt and pepper. Um. I totally added way too much pepper. This rice had bite! Bring to a boil. Cover and reduce to a simmer. Cook for about 16 minutes. Turn off heat and eat – OR, if you want the best rice ever, follow …

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Video Saturday: Colombia (plus winner is announced)

Today really is a happy Saturday! I’ve been smiling, ear to ear, reading your entries to our book giveaway. I am impressed with all of you; what Adventurous foodies you are! Thank you for participating, reading, and being my online buddies. I’m the luckiest girl in the world Random.org chose the winner for me (thank goodness because otherwise I would have never been able to) Congratulations to Katie! Katie said: I love experimenting with different recipes and incorporating new ingredients. I think it is important to not only expose our children to different cultures and tastes but also that variety makes for a healthier diet. This summer we grew thai chiles, tomatillos and asian green beans in our Maryland garden. Contact me at sasha @ globaltableadventure dot com to claim your prize – one copy of Linda Bladholm’s book Latin & Caribbean Grocery Stores Demystified! Yay And now for a couple of videos: First, beautiful Colombian Ceviche and other dishes. The use of citrus is ubiquitous. And, did you know, 900,000,000 kg of coffee is exported …

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World Food Giveaway (with poll)

Because the leaves are changing, and because I’m feeling fiesty, let’s do a book giveaway. And not just any book give away. This is a “must have” book for anyone who loves Latino/Caribbean food. (Mmmm, doesn’t everyone?) The book: Latin & Caribbean Grocery Stores Demystified by Linda Bladholm There’s nothing I enjoy more than plunging into one of Miami’s many latin markets with Linda at my side–and now you can, too, wherever you live. Her carefully researched, clearly presented information will let you shop with confidence. And her charming and enthusiastic approach will make it fun. This indispensable guide will turn your trepidation into delight. –Kathy Martin, Food Editor, The Miami Herald How to win: I’m guessing that you read this web site because you are interested in international food, travel, and culture. Awesome. Or you are standing by to see if I actually can cook one meal for every country in the world! Or perhaps you just like watching videos of cute babies eating international food…. which, trust me, I get. Super-duper. Either way…. …

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Poached Egg Soup | Changua con Huevo

Serves 4 Rethink eggs! Poached eggs swimming in milky broth is a delicious Colombian specialty which is perfect for breakfast, brunch, lunch, or a light dinner. You can easily make this soup vegetarian by using vegetable broth. Ingredients: 4 cups broth (vegetable or chicken) 2 cups milk 4 eggs 3 green onions, sliced sprig cilantro, chopped salt pepper Method: Add stock to a large pot. Sploosh. Then add milk. Splash. Heat the broth and milk to almost simmering. Meanwhile, spread some thinly sliced green onion on the bottom of the bowls. Sprinkle with some chopped cilantro, too. When a few bubbles barely break through the surface of the hot liquid, you are ready to drop your eggs in to poach. Except you never, ever “drop” them. If you do, they’ll break, separate, make a big mess…. Instead, Break the eggs into a small, heatproof ramekin and gently “dip it and tip it” into the water. Let me show you what I mean. In this picture the ramekin is actually on the water… and partially dips …

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Menu: Colombia

This week’s Colombian menu is a collection of zippity-quick recipes with big flavor impact. And if you’re thinking poached eggs are too hard… think again. You’ll be a poached egg pro by the time you’re done reading my tips. Salad Greens with Avocado Dressing (Vinagreta de Aguacate) [Recipe] Thick and creamy dressing made with avocado, lime juice, fresh cilantro, vinegar, and olive oil. Party Rice with Cola (Arroz con Coca Cola) [Recipe] Rice becomes hauntingly sweet when cooked with water and cola. Sautéed onion adds depth of flavor. Poached Eggs in Broth (Changua con Huevo) [Recipe] Light broth made with milk and chicken stock serves as the poaching liquid for eggs. Served on a bed of thinly sliced scallions and fresh cilantro. Good for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Colombian Oatmeal Smoothie (Avena) [Recipe] Oatmeal, brown sugar, and cinnamon cooked with plenty of milk. This creamy milkshake is perfect for brunch.

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About the Food of Colombia

At the tippity-top of South America sits the great country called Colombia. Colombians benefit from a varied landscape, from mountains and rainforest – typical of South America, to sun-bleached Caribbean beaches. To quote National Geographic (and the prettiest sentence I’ve read in recent history – it actually makes me hungry for sand)… Wedged between Venezuela to the east, Brazil to the south, and the Caribbean to the north, it’s the only country in South America whose sugared beaches are lapped by both the Atlantic and Pacific. If this sentence also made you hungry, Colombian food will satisfy. Aside from their world famous coffee, the food and drink is hearty and plentiful. Eggs and meat provide the basis for most meals. Avocado and corn also contribute to an endless bounty of salads, dressings, sauces, tamales, and breads. The “national dish” is considered bandeja paisa, a giant platter filled with meats, sausages, fried eggs, beans, rice, fried plantains, salad, and cornmeal fritters. I’m not exactly sure how all that food could possibly count for just one dish! …