About the Food of Venezuela

La Gran Sabana (Venezuela). Photo by Inti.

La Gran Sabana (Venezuela). Photo by Inti.

Venezuela is the last of our South American countries, and, thanks to this T-shaped country, we’re saying goodbye to the continent in style.

Let’s toast the 1,700 miles of coastline with a tizana [Recipe], a fruit punch made with tons of cut up fruit. Let’s cheer for the southeastern highlands with a sip of chicha, fermented corn drink. Let’s dance along her northern mountains with a splash of rum. And let’s slip along the northwestern lowlands with a thick and creamy glass of cocada (a.k.a. coconut milkshake).

Morning view of Kukenan and Roraima tepuis, from Tëk river camp (river visible in the image), in Gran Sabana, Venezuela. Photo by Paolo Costa Baldi.

Morning view of Kukenan and Roraima tepuis, from Tëk river camp (river visible in the image), in Gran Sabana, Venezuela. Photo by Paolo Costa Baldi.

After we’ve drunk our fill, we can gobble up a a few arepas, topped with avocado chicken salad. These are the quintessential snacks of Venezuela, and can be filled with a million other things, too.

Virgen de la Paz in Trujillo, Venezuela. Photo by Photocapy.

Virgen de la Paz in Trujillo, Venezuela. Photo by Photocapy.

If you want something more substantial, let’s pull up to a plate of Pabellón Criollo, a platter of black beans, slow cooked beef, rice, and plantains. This is the national dish of Venezuela, a favorite in all regions of the country.

Playa La Salina, Margarita, Nueva Esparta, Venezuela. Photo by Wilfredor.

Playa La Salina, Margarita, Nueva Esparta, Venezuela. Photo by Wilfredor.

Of course, I like the idea of keeping things simple, too. Perhaps we can end the day with folded cachapas [Recipe], a pancake of sorts made with fresh corn and topped with cheese. Speaking of cheese, a sprinkling is most definitely s a happy element of Venezuelan cooking. The most popular is Queso de Mano, a soft and creamy cheese like mozarella which makes its way on the cachapas and the arepas.

Salto Angel (Angel Falls), official name: Kerepakupai merú. Photo by Rich Childs.

Salto Angel (Angel Falls), official name: Kerepakupai merú. Photo by Rich Childs.

And let’s not forget the sweet side of Venezuela. Perhaps a slice of bien me sabe will do the trick: a milk and coconut soaked cake topped with meringue. Or then again, maybe you’d rather marquesa, a no-bake cookie and chocolate layered cake. Either way your smile will be bigger after some stovetop travels to Venezuela.

Maps and flag courtesy of the CIA World Factbook.

Maps and flag courtesy of the CIA World Factbook.

What are your favorite dishes from this beautiful country?

The Catatumbo Lightning in Venezuela. Photo by Thechemicalengineer.

The Catatumbo Lightning in Venezuela. Photo by Thechemicalengineer.

Opt In Image
Hungry for more?
Be notified when National Geographic releases my memoir.

Simply fill in your details below.

Comments

  1. What a beautiful set of photos, and how interesting the Catatumbo lightning phenomenon! Did not know about it… fascinating!

    • aunty eileen says:

      Yes ‘sallybr’ and, for me, pictures such as these shows and reminds me just how glorious planet Earth is… and the abundance of glorious meals we people can create from it.

    • Sasha Martin says:

      Yes, yes! It must be pretty incredible in person!

  2. All the photos are beautiful and the food sounds amazing. How did your eating the world convention go on Saturday? I would love to hear about it.

    • Sasha Martin says:

      It was incredible!! I plan on posting up about it after finishing up these last few countries… so watch for a recap in November :)

Speak Your Mind

*