Salty Salty Chai

Every time I sip a cup of tea, my lips naturally curl up into a smile.

It’s the world’s best mood enhancer.

Chai tea is particularly warming.

In Kazakhstan people like to add salt, pepper, butter, and even sour cream (Kalmak) to their tea.

It’s a whole new world of flavor.

If you’re feeling adventurous add a few salty shakes, buttery tabs, or sour cream plops into our homemade chai.

You can also try it with plain black tea – like we did with our butter tea from Bhutan.

It’s all good.

As long as it makes you smile!

Don’t you think?


Salty Salty Chai
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In Kazakhstan people like to add salt, pepper, butter, and even sour cream (Kalmak) to their tea.
Servings Prep Time
1 person 5 minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 person 5 minutes
Salty Salty Chai
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
In Kazakhstan people like to add salt, pepper, butter, and even sour cream (Kalmak) to their tea.
Servings Prep Time
1 person 5 minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 person 5 minutes
Ingredients
  • 1 cup black tea , prepared
  • salt
  • pepper
  • butter
  • sour cream
Servings: person
Units:
Instructions
  1. Season black tea as desired.

7 Comments

  1. Jessica Bennett says

    What I do when I hear of dish I’ve never heard of is try to picture the taste in my mind. So, salt in tea. . . yes, I can taste that in my mind- it makes sense. Same with pepper and butter. But sour cream? That one I can’t imagine. Of course, I don’t like sour cream and try to avoid it whenever possible, so perhaps that’s why I can’t imagine it in tea. Did you try your tea with sour cream?

    • Sasha Martin says

      Kalmak has to be a different type because regular sour cream curdled on me. 🙁

      • Esmee says

        I stumbled on your post on salty tea with other ingredients added, one being called “kalmak”
        I haven’t tried but you mentioned sour cream curdled in your tea.
        I grew up in Romania . In Romanian language there is a word : caimac .
        CAIMAC is the product resulting from boiling milk and letting it cool. Milk in its pure form, like you get it from the cow, is fat, when you boil it and cool it the fat raises to the top and forms a thick creamy layer called CAIMAC.
        Romanian language has an important proportion of words of Turkish origin despite being a mainly Romance language. I worked in Armenia for two years as a peace Corps volunteer and being exposed to Armenian language I discovered few words that were exactly the same as in Romanian. Both of probably of Turkish origin.
        Long story short the product they add to tea in Kazakhstan might be the same product therefore it doesnt curdle because it’s boiled already and not fermented as sour cream is.
        Sorry for the long interruption! I am fascinated by languages. I speak 2 fluently and mess my way through other two languages. It’s interesting to see how words travel…

    • Sasha Martin says

      Oh yes! Me, too – not sure how I forgot that one – I just had that last night.

  2. Brian S. says

    I’ve run into salty tea in the Yasin Valley, high in the mountains where the Hindu Kush meet the Karakorams. But your recipe isn’t clear… do you just make a cup of tea and add salt? And how much salt? One teaspoon of salt is 2000 mg, your daily maximum.

    • Sasha Martin says

      Yes, sorry – just make a cup of tea and add salt. The total amount is up to you – sort of like adding sugar to tea – everyone is going to like a different amount.

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