Russian “Egg, Egg & Caviar”

The scrambled eggs in Russia are so moist and creamy, you’d swear there’s cheese folded up inside. To achieve this texture, the eggs are never whisked or salted at this stage, but broken directly into a pot (not a pan), then cooked over gentle heat in a “on again, off again” game that makes Ross and Rachel’s relationship on Friends look stable. Finally, a generous swoosh of heavy cream and a sprinkle of seasoning finishes the eggs off right.

Then, while they’re still steaming hot, you slide them inside a hollowed out egg shell.

Even with all this glamour, it’s the glimmering, shimmering egg topper that really steals the show: the caviar (a.k.a. more eggs).

Caviar is Russia’s love. To give you an idea of how precious these fish eggs are, imagine spending $8,000 on a pound of anything. Well-to-do Russians are happy to spend that much per pound on caviar. Thankfully for the wallet, one only eats an ounce or two in one sitting.

I got the idea for today’s recipe from Andrew Zimmern. Here’s how they make egg, egg in one of the fanciest hotels in Russia (watch at about 8 minutes 35 seconds):

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P.S. If you’re not in the mood to make eggs, you can eat caviar with nothing more than a spoon. This is considered extra deluxe in Russia (a.k.a. super rich).

Makes 4-5 

Ingredients:

5 eggs
1 Tbsp butter
1-2 Tbsp cream
1 Tbsp chopped chives
salt & pepper

caviar, to taste

Method:

Use a pin to poke a hole in the top of your egg. Flick pieces of shell outward to make an opening in your egg. Place the egg innards in a bowl, then rinse the shells and set aside to dry. The top doesn’t have to be perfect, as the scrambled eggs will cover it up nicely.

Repeat for all the eggs.

Meanwhile, chop up some chives and a bit of heavy cream.

Add the butter and eggs to a pot. Heat over gentle heat while whisking constantly. Never let the mixture scramble. Continue to remove from heat to let the eggs set slowly. Then, when you are about done, whisk in the cream, salt, pepper, and chives, to taste.

Gordon Ramsey has a great demo, to see this technique in action:

When you’re done, fill the egg shells with the scrambled eggs…

… top with a bit of sour cream and, of course, the caviar.

It’s so pretty, she’s actually curious.


Well, at least she tried it!

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The scrambled eggs in Russia are so moist and creamy, you’d swear there’s cheese folded up inside. To achieve this texture, the eggs are never whisked or salted at this stage, but broken directly into a pot (not a pan), then cooked over gentle heat in a “on again, off again” game that makes Ross and Rachel’s relationship on Friends look stable. Finally, a generous swoosh of heavy cream and a sprinkle of seasoning finishes the eggs off right. Then, while they’re still steaming hot, you slide them inside a hollowed out egg shell.Russian "Egg, Egg & Caviar"
Servings
4-5eggs
Servings
4-5eggs
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Use a pin to poke a hole in the top of your egg. Flick pieces of shell outward to make an opening in your egg. Place the egg innards in a bowl, then rinse the shells and set aside to dry. The top doesn't have to be perfect, as the scrambled eggs will cover it up nicely. Repeat for all the eggs.
  2. Meanwhile, chop up some chives and a bit of heavy cream. Add the butter and eggs to a pot. Heat over gentle heat while whisking constantly. Never let the mixture scramble. Continue to remove from heat to let the eggs set slowly. Then, when you are about done, whisk in the cream, salt, pepper, and chives, to taste.
  3. When you’re done, fill the egg shells with the scrambled eggs. Top with a bit of sour cream and, of course, the caviar.
Source:

Recipe Copyright Sasha Martin, Global Table Adventure. For personal or educational use only. This recipe and hundreds more from around the world may be found at www.GlobalTableAdventure.com.

11 Comments

  1. elisa waller says

    My”aunt” joan..one of the best cooks I had around when growing up use to make her eggs this way but with black caviar…..I would eat them minus the caviar…..One time I sort of ran away from home and the next morning my dad found me at my best friends house in town, he didnt know what to do or say so he asked if I wanted to talk to my aunt joan or our long time neighborhood friend…I picked my “aunt” joan because she was so darn interesting and always had some kind of new yorker world traveled adventure at her house, as she was a clothing designer who traveled the world……anyway dad dropped me off at her house around breakfast time and we successfully chatted while she cooked then served these russian style eggs…so super nice and creamy with (sexy) chives…and she had hers with caviar….I thought I was in fancy land….thee most fantastic way to make eggs…good memory and my first time ever eating eggs that way! The little runaway in me wanted to stay a while…LOL…see how food is such a profusion! <3

    • Sasha Martin says

      What a special memory! Sometimes all we need is a blast of something new and different to see the world refreshed. xo

  2. Christine Costa says

    If you’re going to eat straight caviar off the spoon, make sure it’s mother of pearl – metal ruins the taste of the caviar!

    • Christine Costa says

      Or plastic if mother of pearl is outside of your budget :) (as it is mine).

  3. Kebby Jones says

    This is great! I just made eggs like this (they were pretty close to Gordon Ramsey’s “on toast” version), and we happily ate them up! :) I didn’t have any chives, so I put in a tiny pinch of garlic powder with the sour cream at the end. Yum, yum! We’ll have to make these again sometime. Maybe someday we’ll do the caviar version. I’ve never had caviar, but I do like the little bit of fish roe on Philadelphia Rolls at my favorite sushi place. So, I’d try caviar if I got the chance.

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  5. I LOVE caviar! I’m always waithin for the New Year because it’s too expensive to buy it often. It’s a real delicacy and i totally ADORE it.
    PS I’m from St Petersburg, btw)

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