Fun Fact Friday: Cameroon (with poll)

  • Cameroon’s name derives from the Portuguese word for shrimp.

Speaking of shrimp…

When Ava was a newborn we called her shrimp and the basket she napped in we called her “shrimp basket.”

She is the sweetest thing I’ve ever laid eyes on. I could just eat her up. Nom nom.

We propped our little shrimp up by 5 gazillion blankets and one boppy (never unattended, mind you).

Pretty cozy for a shrimp basket.

Yawn. ZZZzzz.

She did a lot of that those first weeks.

That’s right. I’m one of those moms.

I’ll talk/love/gush/ramble on about my baby Ava any chance I get.

Thanks, Cameroon for giving me a reason to talk my daughter. :D

Ok, back on topic.

  • Different oils are available in Cameroon’s varied regions: generally red palm oil in the south and sesame in the north
  • Country onions are used for seasoning along with garlic and hot peppers, usually habenero. The small country onion (the bulb is about the size of a large grape) adds a smoky garlic note to food.
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Comments

  1. Other oils used :

    – Walnut Oil
    – Hazelnut Oil
    – Argan Oil

  2. Keith Gennon says:

    Which oil is the ‘best’ for you?! (healthiest)

  3. Walnut, Hazelnut, Coconut

  4. Jessica Bennett says:

    coconut oil

  5. Christine says:

    Walnut oil, hazelnut oil, coconut oil, soybean oil, pumpkin seed oil

    Not for cooking? Motor oil, vitamin e oil… :)

  6. cocnut oil is good good, as is grapeseed oil…and avocado oil is really good, flax seed oil is probably the most healthy!

  7. Linda Bladholm says:

    I love coconut oil, it is rich in the good for you fats contrary to common belief that is bad fotr you. The best is the natural pressed type sold in health food stores–it is the hydrogenated that is bad. South Indian stir fries made with black mustard seeds, split dal (lentils) and curry leaves sizzled in coconut oil with veggies and shrimp are delicious. Bengali dishes are cooked in mustard oil, adding a buttery hot edge–the best is cold pressed from Australia.

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