Recipe: Brazilian Romeo and Juliet (Romeu e Julieta)

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Makes 10 servings

This unusual treat can be served either for dessert or as a snack. The sweet and salty combination is shocking to my sheltered palette, but Brazilians serve this beloved treat up in many forms. For less of a salty/sweet contrast, try spreading a dab of cream cheese on top of the Guava paste. This mild spread is more suited to the sweet guava. Also, consider using queso blanco, a less salty cheese.

 

P.S. Here’s a related recipe, called the Martin Fierro, which we made when we cooked Uruguay.

Ingredients:

1 block of guava paste (available at some Latino and Asian grocers)
1 block of white cheese, (like queso fresco or canastra)
toothpicks

Method:

1. Slice guava paste and cheese in thin, even slices (preferably thinner than what I did – I just know you’ll do a better job because you won’t have a teething baby begging you to get a move on).

2. Layer 2-4 per toothpick, alternating colors.

3. Serve chilled or room temperature.

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Comments

  1. I have cut guava paste into little squares and placed inside half a ready made biscuit and baked…kids and adults love them. Healthier than frying. I used one of those buttery canned biscuits that come in layers…easy to break apart and make a tiny turnover. YUM

    • globaltable says:

      Lulu, what a neat idea. I have plenty leftover – this might be an interesting way to use them up (although I might have to use my Johnny Cakes recipe from Belize – they’re real similar to biscuits)…

  2. Hi-
    I know it’s silly to post this note so long after your entry, but I just found your blog, and as a former resident of Tulsa I feel compelled to say that you can get guava paste and many other Hispanic items at Reasor’s. I used to shop at the one near the fairgrounds, but they are probably all the same. Incidentally, even though I now live in a much larger city, I’ve come to appreciate the diverse groceries available in Tulsa. Shopping at Nam Ha, Petty’s, the Cherry St. Farmer’s Market, and Reasor’s pretty much supplied everything I wanted. And also, you might enjoy this dish better if you substituted cream cheese or a mild cheese like Monterrey Jack, both of which would be considered authentic. Finally, your daughter must be the cutest little girl in Oklahoma!

    • Sasha Martin says:

      Thanks for your comment Dan! I sure wish I knew about this when I was hunting around for the Guava paste lol. Sometimes I don’t even check the supermarket – especially if I’ve not heard of something I assume it must be a specialty item. Silly, I suppose! Finally, thanks for the compliments on Miss Ava. She melts my heart on a daily basis :)

  3. I came to this recipe from your Brasil page and I wanted to say everything posted looks amazing! One comment on the cheese though: if you ever get the chance to go to Brasil, make sure to try this there! I lived in Brasil for a little over a year and this was one of my favorite occasional snacks, but I found when I came back that their white cheese is not the same as queso fresco, and unfortunately I haven’t been able to find anything closer. :(

    Still great selection of recipes though – cheers!

Trackbacks

  1. [...] Brazilian Romeo and Juliet – an interesting combination of guava paste and cheese [...]

  2. [...] What is it: Guava paste and white cheese stacked on top of each other. Tastes like: A guava and white cheese finger sandwich. Conclusion: WTF, who came up with this? And why so good? Get a recipe here. [...]

  3. [...] What is it: Guava paste and white cheese stacked on top of each other.Tastes like: A guava and white cheese finger sandwich. Conclusion: WTF, who came up with this? And why so good?Get a recipe here. [...]

  4. [...] Romeu e Julieta – guava paste and white cheese, usually a dessert or snack [...]

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