About the food of Zimbabwe

A bridge near Victoria Falls. Photo by Someone35

A bridge near Victoria Falls. Photo by Someone35

Yesterday, I mentioned my fear of crossing “the chasm”, towards the final post of this Adventure.

And yet, here we are. Time stalls for none.

This is the first step over Victoria Falls from Zambia to Zimbabwe.

"Here's a view of Victoria Falls from the helicopter. (You'll probably want to click the image to see a larger picture, where you'll find this caption waiting for you at the bottom.) At the left the broad Zambezi plunges 100 metres into the first gorge, raising the eternal cloud of mist and forming a rainbow visible in front of the bridge across the gorge. We're overflying Zimbabwe at the moment; the "Knife Edge" from which the first photo of the falls above was taken protrudes from the Zambia side above and to the left of the bridge. The bungee jumping platform is visible at the centre of the bridge, near the top of the rainbow. Electricity generation in Zambia is in excess of 99% hydroelectric; a power station is visible at the right of the image, along with outflow from the turbines into the gorge. After the falls, the Zambezi traverses a series of zigzag gorges, the first two of which are visible here." Photo and words by John Walker (2001)

“Here’s a view of Victoria Falls from the helicopter. At the left the broad Zambezi plunges 100 metres into the first gorge, raising the eternal cloud of mist and forming a rainbow visible in front of the bridge across the gorge. We’re overflying Zimbabwe at the moment; the “Knife Edge” from which the first photo of the falls above was taken protrudes from the Zambia side above and to the left of the bridge. The bungee jumping platform is visible at the centre of the bridge, near the top of the rainbow. Electricity generation in Zambia is in excess of 99% hydroelectric; a power station is visible at the right of the image, along with outflow from the turbines into the gorge. After the falls, the Zambezi traverses a series of zigzag gorges, the first two of which are visible here.” Photo & words by John Walker (2001)

There are a few restaurants near the falls, like the Rainforest Cafe, where you can get a Crocodile Tail Wrap with wasabi.

Talk about fusion!

The Boggie Clock in Gweru, Zimbabwe. In the background is the Midlands Hotel.  Photo by Akumudzi.

The Boggie Clock in Gweru, Zimbabwe. In the background is the Midlands Hotel. Photo by Akumudzi.

As one travels further into the heart of this southern African country, more traditional foods appear, like pumpkin greens (bowara) cooked with peanut butter, peanut butter stews, and even pumpkin and peanut butter. (Here are three recipes for pumpkin and squash enjoyed in Zimbabwe)

Not enough peanut butter for you? Next time you boil up rice (white or brown), stir in a few spoonfuls of peanut butter – just enough so that you can shape the rice into balls.  This is called Mupunga une dovi.

Zimbabwe Sunset. Photo by Steve Evans.

Zimbabwe Sunset. Photo by Steve Evans.

Serve your meal with anything from the tradtional sadza (a maize-based, stiff porridge), to the cities’ sweet buns made with yeast and sugar.

Many foods you might recognize from South Africa are also popular in Zimbabwe, such as malva pudding (a cake soaked in custard, like a South African “tres leches” of sorts), and Candy Cake [Recipe]. Since the papaya grows well in the hot climate, papaya candy, called mapopo, is a big hit with the children.

Pungwe Falls, Nyanga National Park, Zimbabwe. Photo by Babakathy.

Pungwe Falls, Nyanga National Park, Zimbabwe. Photo by Babakathy.

Meat and fish are preserved by drying, then either enjoyed as jerky or reconstituted in stews.

You can wash it all down with a Rock Shandy, a refreshing blend of sparkling water, citrus juice, and bitters.

Maps and flag of Zimbabwe courtesy of the CIA World Factbook.

Maps and flag of Zimbabwe courtesy of the CIA World Factbook.

This country of plateaus and tropics, certainly has much to enjoy.

Now, how about a little proverb from Zimbabwe, for you to ponder:

“Until the lion tells his side of the story, the tale of the hunt will always glorify the hunter.”

I’m curious… do you agree?

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Comments

  1. In one sense, I’m rather glad it is “over” (whew)

    After all, for a couple of logistical reasons, I did not get to try the great majority of recipes…(vegetarian, cooking for one, ..) It was fun and interesting reading the recipes, however; and the pictures chosen to give the reader a flavor of each country were fantastic.

    I’ll really miss the creative Monday Meal review Video showing the Stars of the show and how they grow weekly and transform…..especially AvaMarie. (you and Keith were ok, too)

    You kept to your original theme and did not encourage any controversial or negative world news about the countries…you drew a line in the sand and did not cross it…

    All in all, there has been a nice balance of art and education, instruction and philosophy…which kept everything sooo appealing. The photographs of food are top notch.

    • Sasha Martin says:

      Thanks Mom! I think some people wonder how I can always stick to the positive, even wondering if I’m being superficial, but this life is a journey of discovery. My decisions today are informed by days long since gone past. I continue to evolve, but never forget who I am or where I came from. I celebrate the positive because I come from a place of longing for that, as you know. xo

  2. I agree with Mom. Great series in every way. Beautiful photos, instructive texts, delicious food. Brava.

  3. Congratulations! It’s an amazing thing you’ve done!

  4. It’s been a pleasure witnessing your philosophy, mothering skills, neighborliness, cooking skills, interests in world culture, writing skills, Keith’s video and tech skills, and your beautiful photography. Looking forward to seeing your book come out. I’ll return to your site often to pull information and recipes. Thanks so much for sharing, Sasha. Best of luck on your next steps.

  5. I can’t believe it’s at an end! I feel like I found you so recently, I missed out on so much but I’ve gone back and read almost every post since I discovered your wonderful blog! You have inspired me to expose my children to new tastes and maybe even embark on a table top journey of my own! Thank you!

    • Sasha Martin says:

      Kari, this makes me so happy! I hope you make many happy memories with your family as you try the recipes. Perhaps you can hang a world map near the table, or a globe to spin. Kids love that!

  6. elisa waller says:

    Im happy for you in more ways than one..and I am curious to your next step….woo hoo!!! and Yes I do agree with your proverb..the tale of the hunt will glorify the hunter I would find it very appealing to see the “hunt” through the lions eyes….<3 I Love you ! <3

    • Sasha Martin says:

      I so appreciate your help in talking through the “next step” phase. I think much of what we brainstormed with our brother will come to life… I love you, too!

  7. aunty eileen says:

    I don’t know what your “ponder” is on the proverb you asked us to ponder. Mine is: For peace loving people, there are two or more sides to every story and there is never any clarity or peace or glory for any one when any of the sides are denied conversation and being heard.

    p.s. can you share here what you “brainstormed” for “the “next step” phase”. Now you have me curious. Thanks!

    • Sasha Martin says:

      That’s the beauty of storytelling in the modern era – everyone has the opportunity to share their point of view, whether through a blog, a book, or a song, or some other medium. It’s exciting! Next step is still in development. Think global holidays, recipes, and more fun!

      • aunty eileen says:

        Thanks for revealing a bit about “the next step”, Sasha. As far as far as “storytelling” and ‘sharing a point of view’, I prefer opportunity of conversation where it is possible for people to interact for clarity and to expand on points of views, etc. I never did like guessing games and I also dislike being forced to assume, etc. I am happy to know you will be doing more recipes, etc. <3

  8. I found your blog when we moved to Way rural Oklahoma and now rural rural again where I can’t buy my favorite ethnic food but have had to figure out on my own. Thank you, thank you as I’ve spent hours happily browsing your site as it’s provided a much needed escape as a world traveler who moved to the boonies. Thanks for sharing and happy journeys on your next steps.

    • Sasha Martin says:

      I hope you’ve found some recipes you can make, even while out in the countryside! I’m glad you’ve enjoyed the reveries, Ingrid!

  9. Hello Sasha Martin. Congrats to you and your family, for making it to the finish line, after your adventurous table top journey. Seeing the pictures from your October party you have obviously inspired many : . ). I don’t know if you saw me try to say this before on facebook, but what I liked best about your website is I can relate to your love of all things international. It personally makes me the odd one out sometimes in my family, and a few times some family members have teased about my love of trying foreign recipes. Thanks to your website there is not only more treasure (recipes) to explore, but I can show this to relatives and say look who also has this passion. That helps a lot. I ‘ll be looking for your book. Congrats again and take care.

  10. Great Photos!

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