Fun Fact Friday: Benin (with poll)

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Because there is a shortage of information on Benin, I had to dig really deep to find some fun facts. In my search I happened upon a lovely blog by a young woman named Jen. Jen is an American who spent 2 years in Benin for the Peace Corps. I enjoyed reading through her experiences (although I am sad to report that they end mid-trip, suddenly and without explanation). First, I want to share a picture I found of her cooking class in Benin. You will see the lengths Jen and the other students … [Read more...]

About the food of Benin

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Tall, thin, and irregular, Benin juts deep into the African continent, resembling a smoked turkey leg (which just happens to be my favorite fair food here in Oklahoma). Thanks to this unusual geography there is a notable difference between the food in the semi-arid north and the tropical south. Traditional Cuisine: Corn is the starch of choice in the more fertile south, whereas yams are more popular in the dry north. In both cases, the starch is cooked down into a mush-like consistency … [Read more...]

About the Food of Belize

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I hope you had a splendid Memorial Day weekend.  As for myself?  Well.  When it comes to long weekends I over-book and under-accomplish.  After creating a ten-item honey-do list, I typically only manage to "check off" half of one item.   The reason I didn't get anything done?  We went out and had fun splashing at the water park,  romancing on a dinner date, rummaging at yard-sales, swimming with a friend, and more! There's worse things than undone chores, let me tell you. All that … [Read more...]

About Belgian Food

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In general, Belgian food is a balancing act between the rustic and the exotic. Belgians love most any kind of meat, not limited to chicken, beef, ham, and veal, but including specialties like pate, goose, duck, boar, partridge, and any kind of sausage. Escargots, or snails are also popular, as are mussels, trout, perch, turbot, shrimp, and eel. Even with such an extensive list, many Belgians claim steak and French Fries their most beloved dish. Still others enjoy Stoofvlees (meat stew) with the … [Read more...]

About the food of Belarus

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This week is going to be interesting. Simply put, my husband hates mushrooms, rye bread, sour cream, beets, and cabbage... which puts his taste buds in direct opposition to the lovely people of Belarus. Not one to be beat down by pickiness, I've resolved myself to be the cheerful, but broken record: "Honey, if an entire country eats it, then it can't be that bad!" And I'm going to ask (beg) him to eat his entire meal. We'll see. Located in eastern Europe, Belarusian culture blends … [Read more...]

About the food of Barbados

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A couple of years ago my husband spent a week in Chicago for a work training program. Every day his teacher spent 4 hours off-topic, gushing about his trips to the beautiful island. You'd think this would make my husband an expert on Barbados, but unfortunately he didn't take notes. Also known as "Little England," the island of Barbados is an ethnic melting pot. Although the majority of the Bajan people originally came from Africa, the people and the cuisine are also peppered with influence … [Read more...]

About the food of Bangladesh

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Once in a while I hear a word which causes the most curious knee-jerk reaction harking back to my formative school years. For example, whenever I hear the word "Bangladesh" my mind automatically and violently spits back "Dhaka!!!!!" Take this to be a testament to my 7th grade geography teacher. Similar reactions occur when I hear Lima (Peru!!!!!), or Bhutan (Thimphuuuuuu!!!!).  The exclamations marks are subtle compared to how passionately these words materialize. Once out of my … [Read more...]

Fun Fact Friday: Bahrain (Polls)

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Hope your week was lovely! Here are a few fun facts about food and culture in Bahrain: - Souqs are the markets in Bahrain: Historically, souqs were held outside of cities in the location where a caravan loaded with goods would stop and merchants would display their goods for sale. Souqs were held when there was a caravan or more available. At that time, souqs were more than just a market to buy and sell goods; they were also major festivals and many cultural and social activities took place … [Read more...]