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Beef Suqaar

Sometimes we need a meal that can fill every corner of our heart, one that can bump out those rough and tumble emotions that bog us down… the ones that keep us from being happy. Carefree. Enter Suqaar, from Somalia. Suqaar (pronounced sooh-car) is one of Somalia’s most beloved dishes and can be made with any meat, from lamb, to chicken, to beef. Generally the meat is cut into very small pieces, about 1/2″ cube or smaller. The meal is then rounded out with an assortment of veggies – usually carrots, bell pepper, onion, and -sometimes – potato. There are no complex spices. There are no convoluted cooking techniques. Just good food, hot and happy. While some like to add cumin, most recipes omit any spice but salt. The flavors are simple and reflect the Italian influence on Somali food (hello, garlic and onion!). The meat and vegetable juices reduce to form a luscious gravy … and a delicate, controlled flurry of cilantro adds the finishing touch. Suqaar can be scooped up with flatbreads, but it …

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Coconut Fish Curry | Cari de Poisson

When the sun dips low and spreads her rouge all over the sky, I enjoy knowing that this glorious watercolor of light travels around the world like a comet, leaving behind a glowing trail for all to see. No matter where they are from, or where they are going. The sun has universal beauty. It makes me smile to know that, somewhere in the Seychelles – half a world away – they, too, see her rose and curried colors curl through the clouds, right before bedtime. And I imagine that maybe, just maybe, they watch the darkening sky at the edge of their sandy shores, while spooning Coconut Fish Curry among friends. Considering fish curry is one of the most popular recipes  in this African island nation, this is a gamble I’m willing to take. Everyone on the islands, from weather-worn fishermen to stern grandmothers, serve up the day’s catch like this, with a little bit of India, China, and France, in the form of homemade curry powder (called massalé), fresh ginger, garlic, and thyme. …

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Indonesian Peanut Sauce

Makes 2 1/2 cups I’ve discovered the secret to a happy belly. Indonesian Peanut Sauce. This is not just any peanut sauce. This is the kind of peanut sauce that leaves you wondering. Hoping. Dreaming. Wishing for more. This sauce is complex. Interesting. Mysterious – full of wonderful flavors you can’t quite identify. Flavors that’ll make you nibble and nibble – until, eventually, you give up trying to figure everything out all the time and simply enjoy. NOTE: Vegetarians and vegans can also enjoy this sauce by simply leaving out the shrimp paste. Ingredients: 1 Tbsp peanut or vegetable oil 1 candle nut*, grated 1 large shallot, chopped 2 cloves garlic, chopped chili pepper (to taste), seeded 1 tsp shrimp paste (sweet or hot)*, optional 5.5 oz can of coconut milk 1 tsp ground coriander 1 cup roasted peanuts 2/3 cup water salt Season with: 2 Tbsp kecap manis* 1-2 limes juiced *available at most Asian markets. Method: There are so many ways to make this peanut sauce. Your best bet is to pull up …

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Indonesian Fried Rice with cow’s eyes | Nasi Goreng

Serves 2-4 Let’s get up and greet the day like an Indonesian. Stretch your arms to the sky. Touch the earth. Pile your plate with fried rice. And cow’s eyes. Now, don’t get me wrong. I don’t mean a cow’s cow eyes. I mean fried eggs. That’s simply what they call them in Indonesia. As far as breakfast goes, Nasi Goreng is incredibly satisfying. Especially if you eat it on top of an 8th century Buddhist monument. And why not? With stove-top travel, we can go wherever we want. Note: This recipe is best made with day-old rice. If you cannot take the time for this, cool your rice in a thin layer on a cookie sheet in the fridge. You should be able to use it after an hour or two. You’re basically looking for it to be dry to the touch. Moist rice will not fry up right – it will get mushy. Also, I left out the chili pepper so Ava could eat it, but locals would often add sliced red chili pepper …

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Angolan Chicken Stew | Muamba de Galinha

Serves 4 Muamba de Galinha gets its unique flavor from Red Palm Oil. This spicy stew tastes great with yuca, or serve over rice. Ingredients: 1 lemon, juiced 4 garlic cloves, crushed 1/2 tsp salt 1 1/2 tsp chili powder 1 chicken cut into quarters 1/2 cup red palm oil 3 onions, diced 1 whole chili pepper 3 tomatoes, quartered 1 lb pumpkin cut into 1.5″ cubes 1 cup chicken broth 1/2 lb frozen okra Method: 1. Mix lemon juice, 2 garlic cloves, salt, and chili powder and rub on the chicken and marinate for one hour (or up to one night). 2. In a large pot heat oil. Brown chicken on all sides. Avoid crowding. Do this is in several batches if you have to. 3. Add onions, remaining garlic, chili pepper, and tomatoes. Bring to a simmer and cover. 5. Cook on low for about 1 hour, or until chicken is tender. 6. Add squash, chicken stock and okra. Cook for 15 minutes or until everything is tender. Serve hot. Votes: 0 Rating: 0 You: Rate this recipe! Print Recipe Muamba de …

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