About the food of Tunisia

Fort Djerba, Tunisia. Photo by Cezary P.

The castles in Tunisia don't look like they are made of stone. Not European stones, anyway. Those make for grey castles - the kind most of us are familiar with. No, Tunisian castles look like sandcastles. The soft yellow stones look like knobs of buttered polenta. Or couscous.  I know, because this is one of the twelve countries I visited when I was a teen. I went for my senior trip (from Luxembourg, where I was living at the time). While I was there I wanted to eat up those … [Read more...]

About the food of Trinidad & Tobago

Maps and flag of Trinidad and Tobago courtesy of CIA World Factbook.

If you'd like to dig into a melting pot, try visiting Trinidad and Tobago via stovetop travel. These Caribbean islands, right off the coast of Venezuela, are known for having absorbed a bit of Spain, Portugal, France, Dutch, China, Africa, Creole, and Indian cooking... and spat it back out in their own, lovely cooking style. From what I can tell, the food is spicy, bold, and - like a brilliant tapestry - layered with infinite threads from the many influences... which weave an intricate flavor … [Read more...]

About the food of Tonga

Royal Sunset Island Resort at 'Atata Island, 30 min boat ride from Tongatapu. Photo by Haanofonua.

If you'd like to make some friends, you might want to head over to the "Friendly Islands," a.k.a. Tonga. There are 170 of these islands to choose from, all dotted through the Southwest Pacific, in Oceania. They got their nickname because they were so kind to Captain Cook when he came there to visit in 1773. Even with all these islands, the CIA World Factbook claims its total area is just four times that of Washington D.C. In this scattered tropical country, vanilla, banana, coconut, … [Read more...]

About the food of Togo

Local house in the Taberma Valley in Togo. The whole area is deignated a UNESCO Heritage Site. Photo by Erik Kristensen.

There's an old Togolese proverb which says "Do not  roast all your corn in the winter."  The proverb sums up Togo nicely. While the words point to importance placed on resourcefulness in this small, west African country, it also points to something much more obvious. The Togolese love their corn. As with most proverbs, they draw from the popular culture from whence they originate. This skinny strip of a country in western Africa really does love their corn, especially cornmeal. … [Read more...]

About the food of Thailand

Water buffalos in Thailand. Photo by Torikai Yukihiro

From her thick, green mountaintops in the north, all the way past her flatlands, through her river basins and glittering skyscrapers, Thailand has it all. And if you thought her landscape is stunning, you should taste the food. There's a zing to Thai food that keeps me coming back; at first I thought it was the sour notes, formed from hefty squirts of lime juice. I do adore a good burst of lime...But over the years I've realized Thai food is far more complex than that. There's a dance … [Read more...]

About the food of Tanzania

Students at Nyanzwa Primary School in Iringa region. Photo by USAID Africa Bureau.

A few months ago, my next door neighbor, Jonathan, told me he was going to Tanzania to shoot documentary footage at an orphanage in Tanzania. "Your going to Tanzania?!" I exclaimed, thrilled with the serendipity of the situation, "Tell me all about the food - what do the children eat?" Over the next several minutes, he enthusiastically described the food of this east African country, possibly most well-known for the breathtaking peak of Mount Kilimanjaro. (Incidentally, if you ever … [Read more...]

About the food of Tajikistan

Women in Tajikistan. Photo by Steve Evans.

In Tajikistan, if you don't have bread, you don't have food. It doesn't matter if the table is piled to the ceiling with meat, vegetables, and sweets. Bread is the purest sustenance to the Tajik people, especially nan (a thick flatbread Tajiks love to decorate with ornate markings). And why not. Bread makes all kinds of sense in this rugged, mountainous land bordered by China, Uzbekistan, and Afghanistan (the country actually sits in Asia). Nan stores well because, if it dries out, the … [Read more...]

About the food of Taiwan

WuShihBi Cape seen behind the DongAo Bay, from the SuHua Highway, a scenic drive on the east coast of Taiwan. Photo by Fred Hsu,

Feeling overcast? You just might love Taiwan. This tropical island east of China is  a mountainous land, where you'll find clouds and the whipping rains common with monsoons.  This week we explore the food that dots along the 13,902 square miles of this small nation. But don't get the wrong idea; just because she's small (about the size of Massachusetts), doesn't mean the people are few and far between. The opposite is true, in fact. There are 1,600 people per square mile which makes … [Read more...]